CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Performance Monday, October 31, 2011 | 8 PM

András Schiff

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
In 1819, publisher Anton Diabelli asked for one variation on a waltz tune for an anthology by various composers; Beethoven wrote 33 and took four years. András Schiff brings his “engrossing … constantly surprising” approach (The New York Times) to bear on this challenging work as the finale of a recital that also includes a sonata by Bartók, the focus of Schiff’s Perspectives residency this season at Carnegie Hall.

Performers

  • András Schiff, Piano

Program

  • BACH Three-Part Inventions, BWV 787-801
  • BARTÓK Piano Sonata
  • BEETHOVEN Diabelli Variations

  • Encore:
  • BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 30 in E Major, Op. 109

Bios

  • András Schiff


    András Schiff was born in Budapest and started taking piano lessons at the age of five with Elisabeth Vadász. He continued musical studies at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music with professors Pál Kadosa, György Kurtág, and Ferenc Rados, and in London with George Malcolm. Recitals and special cycles (including the major keyboard works of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, and Bartók) form an important part of his activities. Between 2004 and 2009, he performed complete cycles of the Beethoven's 32 piano sonatas in 20 cities throughout the United States and Europe, a project recorded live in the Tonhalle Zürich and released in eight volumes for ECM New Series.

    This season, Mr. Schiff was named a Perspectives artist by Carnegie Hall, where he performs in a series of concerts that focus on Bartók and the legacy the composer left on their native Hungary. Unique to this series are the many colleagues who join Mr. Schiff during the 12 concerts included in his Perspectives-most of whom he has known since childhood. Additional North American performances take place in Philadelphia, Princeton, Vancouver, Toronto, Berkeley, Boulder, Napa, and Washington, DC.

    In 1999, Mr. Schiff created his own chamber orchestra, Cappella Andrea Barca, which consists of international soloists, chamber musicians, and close friends. He also works every year with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. From 1989 until 1998, he was artistic director of Musiktage Mondsee, a chamber music festival near Salzburg, and in 1995, he founded the Ittinger Pfingstkonzerte with Heinz Holliger in Kartause Ittingen, Switzerland. In 1998, Mr. Schiff started a similar series, entitled Homage to Palladio at the Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza. From 2004 to 2007, he was artist-in-residence of the Kunstfest Weimar, and in 2007-2008 was pianist-in-residence of the Berliner Philharmoniker.

    Mr. Schiff has established a prolific discography, including recordings for London/Decca (1981-1994), Teldec (1994-1997), and since 1997, ECM New Series. He has received several international recording awards, including two Grammys.

    Mr. Schiff has been awarded numerous prizes, including Zwickau's Robert Schumann Prize, Italy's Premio della critica musicale Franco Abbiati, the Klavier-Festival Ruhr Prize, the Wigmore Medal, and the Royal Academy of Music Bach Prize; in 2006, he was named an Honorary Member of the Beethoven House in Bonn. Also in 2006, Mr. Schiff and the music publisher G. Henle Verlag began collaborating on Mozart and Bach editions. To date, both volumes of Bach's Well-Tempered Klavier were edited in the Henle original text with fingerings by Mr. Schiff.

    Mr. Schiff has been made an honorary professor by the conservatories in Budapest, Detmold, and Munich, and a special supernumerary fellow of Balliol College in Oxford. He is married to violinist Yuuko Shiokawa.

    More Info

Audio

Bach 15 Three-part Inventions, BWV 787/801 - No. 11 in G minor, BWV 797
András Schiff, Piano
Decca

Video

András Schiff and His "Perspectives"
András Schiff introduces the multifaceted series he has assembled for Carnegie Hall audiences throughout the 2011-2012 season.

At a Glance

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH  Three-Part Inventions, BWV 787–801


Bach intended these three-part counterpoint works—which he called “sinfonias”—to guide his students’ instruction, both in keyboard performance and in composition.


BÉLA BARTÓK  Piano Sonata


One of his less frequently performed works, Bartók’s lone piano sonata abides by the Classical form, but does not shy away from acerbic dissonances and vigorous accents.


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN  Thirty-Three Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli, Op. 120


A masterwork of Beethoven’s late period, the “Diabelli” Variations transform a trifling waltz into episodes of utmost originality.

Program Notes
Perspectives: András Schiff

Part of

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