CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Performance Tuesday, April 28, 2015 | 8 PM

New World Symphony

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
An eclectic program that spans Biedermeier Vienna to 20th century Switzerland is performed by Anne-Sophie Mutter, “the undisputed queen of violin playing” (The Times, London), with Michael Tilson Thomas conducting the New World Symphony. Mutter is featured in two 20th-century works: Berg’s profoundly moving Violin Concerto and Moret’s rapturous En rêve, a work written for her in 1988. Schubert’s warmly melodic Incidental Music from Rosamunde opens the concert that climaxes with the shimmering orchestral colors of Debussy’s La mer.

The contemporary work on this program is part of My Time, My Music.

Performers

  • New World Symphony
    America’s Orchestral Academy
    Michael Tilson Thomas, Artistic Director and Conductor
  • Anne-Sophie Mutter, Violin

Program

  • SCHUBERT Incidental Music from Rosamunde
  • BERG Violin Concerto
  • MORET En rêve (NY Premiere)
  • DEBUSSY La mer

  • Encore:
  • BIZET Farandole from L’Arlésienne

Event Duration

The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

Bios

  • New World Symphony
    America's Orchestral Academy


    The New World Symphony, America's Orchestral Academy (NWS), prepares graduates of distinguished music programs for leadership roles in professional orchestras and ensembles. In the 27 years since its co-founding by Artistic Director Michael Tilson Thomas and Lin and Ted Arison, NWS has helped launch the careers of more than 950 alumni worldwide.

    A laboratory for the way music is taught, presented, and experienced, the New World Symphony consists of 87 young musicians who are granted fellowships that last up to three years. The fellowship program offers in-depth exposure to traditional and modern repertoire, professional development training, and personalized experiences working with leading guest conductors, soloists, and visiting faculty. Relationships with these artists are extended through NWS's extensive distance learning via the internet.

    NWS Fellows take advantage of the innovative performance facilities and state-of-the art practice and ensemble rooms of the Frank Gehry-designed New World Center, the campus of the New World Symphony.

    In the hopes of joining NWS, more than 1,500 recent music school and conservatory graduates compete for about 35 available fellowships each year. The Fellows are selected for this highly competitive, prestigious opportunity based on their ability and their passion for the future of classical music.


    Michael Tilson Thomas


    Michael Tilson Thomas is co-founder and artistic director of the New World Symphony, America's Orchestral Academy, where he continues his role as educator in mentoring the next generation of classical musicians. He is also music director of the San Francisco Symphony and principal guest conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, and maintains an active presence guest conducting with the major orchestras of Europe and the United States.

    Mr. Tilson Thomas began his formal studies at the University of Southern California, where he studied piano with John Crown and conducting and composition with Ingolf Dahl. At age 19, he was named music director of the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra. He worked with Stravinsky, Boulez, Stockhausen, and Copland on premieres of their compositions at Los Angeles's Monday Evening Concerts. During this same period, he was the pianist and conductor for Gregor Piatigorsky and Jascha Heifetz.

    In 1969, Mr. Tilson Thomas won the Koussevitzky Prize and was appointed assistant conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He went on to become the BSO's associate conductor and then principal guest conductor, where he remained until 1974.

    Mr. Tilson Thomas's extensive television work includes a series with the London Symphony Orchestra for BBC Television, the television broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic's Young People's Concerts from 1971 to 1977, and numerous productions on PBS's Great Performances. In 2004, Mr. Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony embarked on a multi-tiered media project--Keeping Score--which includes television, websites, radio, and educational programs designed to make classical music more accessible to a new audience.

    Among his many honors and awards, Mr. Tilson Thomas is a Chevalier dans l'ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France, was Musical America's Musician of the Year and Conductor of the Year, was Gramophone magazine's Artist of the Year, and has been profiled on CBS's 60 Minutes and ABC's Nightline. He has won 11 Grammy Awards for his recordings. In 2008, he received the Peabody Award for his radio series for SFS Media, The MTT Files. In 2010, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts in a ceremony at the White House.

    More Info

  • Anne-Sophie Mutter


    Anne-Sophie Mutter has been recognized as one of the world's greatest violinists for more than 35 years. A four-time Grammy Award winner with a longstanding collaboration with Deutsche Grammophon, the violinist's pledge to the future of string playing is evidenced by her wholehearted championship of contemporary music. Her current tally of world-premiere performances includes 22 compositions with works composed for her by Sebastian Currier, Henri Dutilleux, Sofia Gubaidulina, Witold Lutosławski, Norbert Moret, Krzysztof Penderecki, Sir André Previn, and Wolfgang Rihm.

    In addition to curating a six-concert series at Carnegie Hall as a 2014-2015 Perspectives artist, Ms. Mutter makes guest appearances with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Berliner Philharmoniker, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and London Symphony Orchestra, and tours with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Nacional de España, and Cherubini Youth Orchestra. Also this season, she embarks on a six-city tour with The Mutter-Bronfman-Harrell Trio to the cities of Montreal, New York, Northridge, Santa Barbara, Costa Mesa, and Sonoma. The violinist joined her string ensemble, the Mutter Virtuosi, on its first North American tour--which featured North American premieres of Sebastian Currier's Ringtone Variations and Sir André Previn's Concerto for Violin and String Orchestra--to Chicago, Toronto, Atlanta, Naples, and Kansas City, as well as Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.

    Ms. Mutter has long used her public profile to support charitable causes, notably those associated with the alleviation of medical and social problems. Her benefit concerts--62 to date--have raised funds for such organizations worldwide. Ms. Mutter's many awards and honors reflect the nature of her humanitarian work as well as the excellence of her artistry. She received the prestigious Ernst von Siemens Music Prize in 2008, the Légion d'honneur in 2009 for services to contemporary French music, and the 2011 Erich-Fromm-Preis for the advancement of Humanism through social engagement. Additional honors include the Merit Cross 1st Class of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Mendelssohn and Brahms prizes, the Herbert von Karajan Music Prize, and the Bavarian Order of Merit. In 2013, Ms. Mutter was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as a Foreign Honorary Member.

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Audio

Debussy's La mer (Jeux de vagues)
London Symphony Orchestra | Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor
Sony

At a Glance

FRANZ SCHUBERT  Incidental Music to Rosamunde, D. 797

Schubert hoped that a last-minute invitation to compose incidental music for the play Rosamunde might jumpstart his floundering theater career in Vienna, but the production was a flop. Still, he left behind an enduring suite of orchestral music that merged his songlike melodies with the might of a symphony.


ALBAN BERG  Violin Concerto

Even as Berg adopted the revolutionary 12-tone technique of his teacher Arnold Schoenberg, he stayed connected to the lush harmonies and heartfelt emotions of the bygone Romantic era. The Violin Concerto that turned out to be Berg’s final composition was also one of his most expressive, fueled by the recent death of a young family friend. With echoes of Bach and folk music from the Austrian Alps, this concerto dedicated “to the memory of an angel” soars to transcendent heights.


NORBERT MORET  En rêve, Concerto for Violin and Chamber Orchestra

Swiss composer Norbert Moret approached music and life as “an uncompromising and anxious quest for Love.” He was in his 60s when he composed his two breakthrough works: a cello concerto for Mstislav Rostropovich, and En rêve, a mystical and dreamlike violin concerto inspired by and written for Anne-Sophie Mutter. She now offers the first US performances, 17 years after introducing the work in Europe.


CLAUDE DEBUSSY  La mer

Debussy learned as much about his craft from poets and painters as he did from his fellow musicians. The three “symphonic sketches” he composed between 1903 and 1905 drew inspiration from Japanese woodblock printing, as well as his own travels to a seaside retreat in England. The resulting score brought a breathtaking new perspective to the rising sun, the gusting wind, and the ever-changing face of the sea.

Program Notes

Watch

 

Perspectives: Anne-Sophie Mutter
This performance is part of Carnegie Classics, and Perspectives: Anne-Sophie Mutter.

Part of