• 2014 Soloist: Gil Shaham

  • Gil Shaham

    Gil Shaham is one of the foremost violinists of our time, whose combination of flawless technique with inimitable warmth has solidified his legacy as an American master. Highlights of his 2013–2014 season include Korngold’s Violin Concerto with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, The Cleveland Orchestra, and the Orchestre de Paris; a continuation of his exploration of the “Concertos of the 1930s” with the San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and on tour with the Bavarian Radio Symphony; the world, Asian, and European premieres of a new concerto by Bright Sheng; and a recital tour featuring Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin.

    Shaham has more than two dozen concerto and solo CDs to his name, including bestsellers that have appeared on record charts in the US and abroad, winning him multiple Grammys, a Grand Prix du Disque, Diapason d’Or, and Gramophone Editor’s Choice.  His recent recordings are produced on the Canary Classics label, which he founded in 2004; they comprise Nigumin: Hebrew Melodies, Haydn Violin Concertos and Mendelssohn’s Octet with Sejong Soloists, Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works, Elgar’s Violin Concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Butterfly Lovers and Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto, Tchaikovsky’s Piano Trio in A with Yefim Bronfman and Truls Mørk, TheProkofiev Album, The Fauré Album, Mozart in Paris, and works by Haydn and Mendelssohn.

    Shaham was awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 1990, and in 2008 he received the coveted Avery Fisher Award. He plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius. He lives in New York City with his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, and their three children.

  • National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America Lead Sponsor


    Founder Patrons: Blavatnik Family Foundation; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; Marina Kellen French and the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the Robertson Foundation; Robert F. Smith; and Sarah Billinghurst Solomon and Howard Solomon.

    Lead Donors: Ronald O. Perelman and Joan and Sanford I. Weill and the Weill Family Foundation.

    Additional funding has been provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation; Yoko Nagae Ceschina; The Rockefeller Foundation; The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation; and Ann Ziff.

    Public support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.