• Lullaby Project

  • The Lullaby Project, part of Carnegie Hall’s Musical Connections program, creates musical experiences for pregnant women and new mothers in their teenage years or who are facing challenging circumstances such as homelessness or incarceration. The project invites participants to work with professional artists to write a personal lullaby for their babies, strengthening the bond between parent and child. Now extending across the country, the Lullaby Project enables partner organizations to support families in their own communities.

    This project is part of Musical Connections, which offers concerts, creative projects, and long-term residencies across veterans, healthcare, and adult and juvenile settings.

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    Lullaby Project Workshop Session in the Resnick Education Wing on February 4, 2015. (Photography: Jennifer Taylor)

       
    “How to Write a Lullaby”

    Learn how to create a lullaby from singer-songwriter and mother Emily Eagen through this video we made with Too Small to Fail’s Talking is Teaching: Talk, Read, Sing program developed by the Clinton Foundation and The Opportunity Institute.


    Why Making Music Matters

    To better understand the effect of music in early childhood development, Carnegie Hall commissioned a new research paper from Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf, an expert in the field. Titled “Why Making Music Matters,” her research points to several key reasons why investing in children early and often is critical to healthy development and a successful future—and that music can play a role in everyday interactions that support our next generation. Download ›

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  • Part of Musical Connections, a program of Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute.

    Lead support is provided by the Brooke Astor One-Year Fund for New York City Education.

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    United logo 13/14

    Major funding for Musical Connections is provided by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust, MetLife Foundation, the Heineman Foundation for Research, Education, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes, and United Airlines®.

    Additional support has been provided by Ameriprise Financial.

    Public support for Musical Connections is provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York City Departments of Homeless Services and Probation, the New York City Administration for Children's Services, and New York City Council Members Daniel Dromm and Annabel Palma.

  • Project Design

    Lullaby Project Design
    Each Lullaby Project is compact in order to respond to participant and partner staff needs, with three creative interactions.

    The three creative interactions include a composition session, a professional recording session, and a group-sharing session. At the end of the project, each participant receives a CD of her lullaby. When planning for a Lullaby Project, many program elements are already in place, including the artists, partnerships, and well-developed evaluation plans.
  • Artist Skills

    Lullaby Artists Skills

    Musical Connections artists also take part in a yearlong professional development program that provides the artists with the time and resources needed to prepare them to be effective facilitators and collaborators.

  • Evaluation

    Lullaby EvaluationEvaluation plans are formed in parallel with project design. It’s imperative to be able to demonstrate the larger impact of this work and discuss its specific successes and challenges.

    The evaluation of the Lullaby Project is developed with the WolfBrown consulting firm and centers on intensive reflection by roster artists, partner staff, and the Weill Music Institute. Updates will be posted online once available.