• Tuesday, Jan 10, 2012

    Carnegie Hall In Partnership With The San Francisco Symphony Presents American Mavericks, March 14 to 30, 2012

    A Celebration of Pioneers of the American Sound Culminating in Four Concerts by the San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas
    Featured Artists Include Emanuel Ax, Mason Bates, Dan Deacon, Jeremy Denk, Kiera Duffy, Paul Jacobs, Joan La Barbara, Matmos, Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble, Jessye Norman, So Percussion,  and the St. Lawrence String Quartet
    Celebration Includes Four Free Carnegie hall Neighborhood Concerts by Alarm Will Sound, Jennifer Koh, Lisa Moore, and the JACK Quartet Presented by Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute 
    New York Partner Events Take Place at Anthology Film Archives, The Kitchen, The New York Public Library, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Whitney Museum of American Art, and on WQXR/Q2 Music
     
    Carnegie Hall, in partnership with the San Francisco Symphony, presents American Mavericks, a citywide celebration of the pioneering spirit of the composers who created a new American musical voice,
    March 14–30, 2012. Providing audiences across New York City with the rare opportunity to experience music by maverick composers—John Cage, Henry Cowell, Lou Harrison, Charles Ives, Harry Partch, Edgard Varèse, and many others—live in concert, Mavericks culminates in four Carnegie Hall performances, March 27, 28, 29, and 30, by Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony with eminent soloists and guest ensembles, featuring four New York premieres: John Adams’s Absolute Jest, Mason Bates’s Mass Transmission, Realm Variations by Meredith Monk, and Morton Subotnick’s Jacob’s Room: Monodrama (2012). Other select highlights of the four SFS programs include an all-star trio of singers—Joan La Barbara, Meredith Monk, and Jessye Norman—performing selections from John Cage’s Song Books; pianist Emanuel Ax playing Morton Feldman’s Piano and Orchestra; organist Paul Jacobs featured in Lou Harrison’s Concerto for Organ with Percussion Orchestra; and a performance of Henry Brant’s arrangement of Charles Ives’s A Concord Symphony. (See attached for complete program details.)

    The San Francisco Symphony’s performances are preceded by “We Are All Going In Different Directions” — A John Cage Celebration led by So Percussion in Zankel Hall on
    Monday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m., featuring contemporary leaders in electronic music Dan Deacon, Matmos, and Cenk Ergün, and violist Beth Meyers, plus four free Neighborhood Concerts presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, March 18–25, in alternative venues throughout the city. Neighborhood Concerts feature some of New York’s most intrepid musicians including Alarm Will Sound, violinist Jennifer Koh, pianist Lisa Moore, and the JACK Quartet with special guest Steven Mackey on electric guitar. (See below and attached for complete program information.)

    ‘American Mavericks’ refers to the groundbreaking composers who’ve thrown the European compositional rulebook aside in order to expand the sonic experience, embracing musical traditions not usually associated with “classical” music and thereby creating a new American sound. In 2000, Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony presented a landmark 12-concert American Mavericks festival in San Francisco. This March, Carnegie Hall partners with SFS as they embark on a second edition of the American Mavericks festival with concerts performed across the US, building upon their successful theme with neighborhood concerts and partner programming across New York City, providing additional context through visual art, dance, films, talks, and performances at Abrons Arts Center, Anthology Film Archives, Brooklyn Public Library, The Greene Space, The Kitchen, LaGuardia Performing Arts Center, (Le) Poisson Rouge, The New York Public Library, Whitney Museum of American Art, and on WQXR/Q2 Music.

    Within the space of 15 days, music by the following Maverick composers will be heard throughout New York City: John Adams, William Basinski, Mason Bates, Martin Bresnick, Don Byron, John Cage, Henry Cowell, Dan Deacon, David Del Tredici, Cenk Urgün, Morton Feldman, Lukas Foss, Philip Glass, Mary Halvorson, Lou Harrison, Jennifer Higdon, Charles Ives, Jerome Kitzke, Steven Mackey, Matmos (M.C. Schmidt and Drew Daniel), Missy Mazzoli, Meredith Monk, Conlon Nancarrow, Harry Partch, Tristan Perich, Steve Reich, Carl Ruggles, Arthur Russell, Frederic Rzewski, Ruth Crawford Seeger, Elliott Sharp, Daniel Smith / Danielson, Morton Subotnick, Jason Treuting / So Percussion, Edgard Varèse, Charlie Wilmoth, and Yoni Wolf / WHY?. In addition, the Whitney Museum of American Art explores visionaries and trailblazers in the visual and performing arts with programs featuring choreographer Michael Clark, painter Nicole Eisenman, and filmmaker Nathaniel Dorsky, presented in conjunction with American Mavericks, as part of the 2012 Whitney Biennial.

    Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony bring American Mavericks programs to three cities before New York, beginning the celebration at home in San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, March 8–18, before travelling to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s Symphony Center for one performance, March 21, and four programs, March 22–25, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, presented by the University Musical Society. Visit americanmavericks.org for more information.

    In conjunction with American Mavericks, Tilson Thomas and the SFS will release a hybrid SACD recording of John Adams’s classic works from the mid-‘80s: Harmonielehre and Short Ride in a Fast Machine. The two works will be released on one disc on March 13, but will be available by exclusive pre-release from the iTunes store on the composer’s birthday: February 15. Harmonielehre, originally commissioned and premiered by the SFS, was recorded live December 8-11, 2010, during Adams’s Project San Francisco composer residency. Short Ride in a Fast Machine, originally commissioned by Tilson Thomas for the Pittsburgh Symphony, was recorded at the San Francisco Symphony’s Centennial Season Opening Gala on September 7, 2011. In 2011, SFS Media released a recording of Tilson Thomas and the orchestra performing Ives’s Concord Symphony as arranged by Henry Brant. This work can be heard live on March 28 at Carnegie Hall.

    Throughout the month of March, WQXR, the country’s most listened-to classical music station, will present ambitious, multimedia-rich, interactive companion programming to deepen the experience of the live performances across the country. Q2 Music, WQXR’s New York-based online station devoted to new music, will become the digital hub for an in-depth exploration of what it means to be an American Maverick. The site will feature a wide array of musical offerings, including archival interviews, guest curators, and a special video webcast of a live event with MTT from the station’s innovative performance venue, The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space.

    Also in conjunction with American Mavericks, the San Francisco Symphony, Carnegie Hall, and University Musical Society will collaborate with universities and conservatories in San Francisco, New York, and Ann Arbor, inviting students to “Break the Rules!” by participating in a number of challenges on Facebook and Twitter designed to launch them into the world of these innovative composers. Visit carnegiehall.org/breaktherules after January 27 for more information. Student tickets and subscriptions for American Mavericks concerts in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage and Zankel Hall are available now and start at $10 per ticket. Visit carnegiehall.org/students for details.

    Additional American Mavericks multimedia content can be found at americanmavericks.org and at carnegiehall.org/mavericks. Fans of American Mavericks are invited to follow online by using the hashtag #AmMavs.



    COMPLETE AMERICAN MAVERICKS PROGRAMMING IN NEW YORK CITY:
    (Presented by Carnegie Hall unless otherwise noted)

    DANCE: Michael Clark
    Open rehearsals: March 14–25; Performances: March 29–April 8; times vary, Whitney Museum of American Art (945 Madison Avenue, Manhattan)
    Choreographer and dancer Michael Clark is known for his integration of classical vocabulary with a more complex, contemporary sensibility. Clark recently founded the Modern Dance Club, a New York-based company whose work engages with the vibrant American experimental dance scene. Presented by the Whitney Museum of American Art, in conjunction with the 2012 Biennial.

    WHY? with Danielson
    Friday, March 16, 7:30 p.m., (Le) Poisson Rouge (158 Bleecker Street, Manhattan)
    Courting the surreal, the sublime, and the existential, American indie rock bands WHY? and Danielson are as maverick as they come. Danielson, the creative outlet of Daniel Christopher Smith, is known for an idiosyncratic sound filled with undulating, chromatic chord progressions. WHY? is comprised of three Midwestern friends who, motivated by the unanswerable question, experiment with common instruments to create uncommonly insightful music. Presented by (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    VISUAL ART: Figure Drawing Atelier
    Friday, March 16, 7:30 p.m., Whitney Museum of American Art (945 Madison Avenue, Manhattan)
    Painter Nicole Eisenman shares her practice of drawing from live models in a figure-drawing class in the galleries of the Whitney Museum. While Eisenman’s figurative style references a range of academic traditions, her razor sharp wit and intimate subjects reveal a language that is completely her own. Presented by the Whitney Museum, in conjunction with the 2012 Biennial.

    Alarm Will Sound
    Sunday, March 18 at 3:00 p.m., Abrons Arts Center at Henry Street Settlement (466 Grand Street, Manhattan)
    In this free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert, presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, the acclaimed new music ensemble performs music by John Cage (Short Theatrical Works), Edgard Varèse (Poème électronique), Conlon Nancarrow (Study No. 2, arr. Gavin Chuck), and Elliott Sharp (Coriolis Effect), plus a world premiere by Charlie Wilmoth.

    Jennifer Koh and Reiko Uchida
    Sunday, March 18 at 4:00 p.m., Brooklyn Public Library, Central Library (10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn)
    In the second free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert of the day, violinist Jennifer Koh and pianist Reiko Uchida offer a recital of music by Jennifer Higdon (String Poetic), John Adams (Road Movies), Missy Mazzoli (Dissolve, O my Heart), and Lou Harrison (Grand Duo).

    FILM: 26’ 1.1499” for a String Player (1973)
    Tuesday, March 20; 7:30 p.m.; Anthology Film Archives (32 Second Avenue, Manhattan)
    To commemorate John Cage’s centennial, Anthology Film Archives screens Jud Yalkut’s video realization of Charlotte Moorman and Nam June Paik’s concert performance of John Cage’s 26’ 1.1499” for a String Player, plus a rarely seen work that features the composer and a special surprise partner. Presented by Anthology Film Archives.

    FILM: Three Films by Nathaniel Dorsky
    March 21–25; times vary; Whitney Museum of American Art (945 Madison Avenue, Manhattan)
    The Whitney will screen three films by inimitable filmmaker Nathaniel Dorsky - The Return (2011), Compline (2010), and Aubade (2010) – in a rotating film program throughout the week of March 21. One of the most gifted and influential filmmakers to emerge from the San Francisco experimental film scene, Nathaniel Dorsky’s short 16mm films are recognized for their distinctly meditative discoveries of rare beauty in everyday life. Dorsky, who was born in New York, captures the wordless dramas of light, shadow and color through rhythmic montage without the use of sound. Presented by the Whitney Museum, in conjunction with the 2012 Biennial.

    FILM: Lou Harrison: A World of Music (2011)
    Wednesday, March 21; 7:30 p.m.; Anthology Film Archives (32 Second Avenue, Manhattan)
    In this sneak-preview film, Lou Harrison: A World of Music paints an intimate portrait of an extraordinary American composer who followed his own dreams with unbridled style. Harrison’s artistic curiosity and courage produced one of the great transcultural visions and musical legacies of the 20th century. Presented by Anthology Film Archives.

    FILM: On Conlon Nancarrow (1983) & West Coast Story: Frontiers of New Music (1986)
    Thursday, March 22; 7:30 p.m.; Anthology Film Archives (32 Second Avenue, Manhattan)
    Eva Soltes’ short-subject documentary On Conlon Nancarrow highlights the life and work of reclusive expatriate American composer Conlon Nancarrow, who hand-punched player-piano rolls, becoming a visionary of the computer music era. His percussive studies for the player piano feature pieces that were unplayable by human hands, often hitting more than 100 notes per second. Filled with rare interview footage and live performances, West Coast Story features composers Lou Harrison, John Cage, Harry Partch, Henry Cowell, Terry Riley, Frank Zappa, John Adams, Daniel Lentz, and Paul Dresher musing on their work and history as they answer the question: What is the difference between Californian and East Coast musical tradition? Presented by Anthology Film Archives.

    Lisa Moore
    Friday, March 23 at 8:00 p.m., LaGuardia Performing Arts Center, The Little Theatre (31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens)
    The founding pianist of the revolutionary Bang on a Can All-Stars performs a free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert with music by Philip Glass, Don Byron, Missy Mazzoli, Martin Bresnick, Henry Cowell, John Adams, Frederic Rzewski, and Jerome Kitzke.

    Instrumentals: Music by William Basinski and Tristan Perich
    Friday March 23, 8:00 p.m., The Kitchen (512 West 19th Street, Manhattan)
    In the first of two envelope-pushing double bills at The Kitchen, William Basinski’s ambient electronic opus Vivian & Ondine shares the evening with Tristan Perich who demonstrates his “1-Bit universe,” mixing custom-built microchips and acoustic instruments. Presented by The Kitchen.

    Instrumentals: Music by Arthur Russell and Mary Halvorson
    Saturday, March 24, 8:00 p.m., The Kitchen (512 West 19th Street, Manhattan)
    The Kitchen’s second double bill begins with a new septet from Brooklyn-based guitarist Mary Halvorson followed by the late Kitchen Music Director Arthur Russell’s acclaimed Instrumentals in a new reading directed by composer Peter Gordon. Presented by The Kitchen.

    JACK Quartet with special guest Steven Mackey
    Sunday, March 25 at 3:00 p.m., Abrons Arts Center at Henry Street Settlement (466 Grand Street, Manhattan)
    In the final free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert, the acclaimed JACK Quartet takes us to the early 20th century, performing Charles Ives’s String Quartet No. 2 and Ruth Crawford Seeger’s String Quartet, before heading into contemporary territory with Steven Mackey’s Physical Property, featuring the composer on electric guitar.

    American Mavericks: Music and Conversation with Michael Tilson Thomas

    Monday, March 26, 7:00 p.m., The Greene Space (44 Charlton Street, Manhattan)
    In a live video webcast from WQXR’s performance venue, The Greene Space, WQXR’s David Garland and Nadia Sirota will host an evening with Michael Tilson Thomas, with featured guests John Adams and the St. Lawrence String Quartet. The event will be broadcast live on 105.9 FM in New York and with live streaming on wqxr.org, while a video webcast will be available at thegreenespace.org. Presented by Q2 Music.

    “We Are All Going in Different Directions”—A John Cage Celebration
    Monday, March 26, 7:30 p.m., Zankel Hall
    Brooklyn-based ensemble So Percussion leads this celebration of the life and music of John Cage, born 100 years ago in Los Angeles. The program features works by Cage as well as compositions by So Percussion and leaders in electronic music, Dan Deacon (who has written a new percussion quintet for the concert), Matmos, and Cenk Ergün. Ara Guzelimian, Provost and Dean of The Juilliard School, and members of So Percussion provide insight into the work of John Cage in a pre-concert discussion at 6:30 p.m.

    San Francisco Symphony
    Tuesday, March 27, 8:00 p.m., Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage (57th Street at Seventh Avenue, Manhattan)
    Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony begin their American Mavericks residency at Carnegie Hall with Amérique, the powerful ode to the adopted home of French-born composer Edgard Varèse and the New York premiere of John Adams’ Absolute Jest for String Quartet and Orchestra with guest ensemble, the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Also on the program are selections from John Cage’s Song Books to be performed by an amazing trio of soloists: Joan La Barbara, Meredith Monk, and Jessye Norman.

    San Francisco Symphony
    Wednesday, March 28, 8:00 p.m., Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage (57th Street at Seventh Avenue, Manhattan)
    The San Francisco Symphony’s second American Mavericks concert at Carnegie Hall includes Carl Ruggles’ Sun-Treader and Henry Brant’s orchestration of Charles Ives’ “Concord” Sonata, inspired by New England’s transcendentalist movement. Renowned pianist Emanuel Ax joins in for a performance of Morton Feldman’s Piano and Orchestra.

    American Mavericks with Members of the San Francisco Symphony
    Thursday, March 29, 8:30 p.m., Zankel Hall (881 Seventh Avenue, Manhattan)
    Michael Tilson Thomas and members of the San Francisco Symphony move downstairs to Zankel Hall for the final two concerts, with MTT serving as conductor and host for a program of music by West Coast composers Lou Harrison, Mason Bates, David Del Tredici, and Harry Partch. The program begins with Daphne of the Dunes by Harry Partch performed by Newband and the New York premiere of Mass Transmission, a new work for organ, chorus, and electronica by composer/DJ Mason Bates with conductor Donato Cabrera, with the Young People’s Chorus of New York City and Bates and organist Paul Jacobs as soloists and David Del Tredici’s Syzygy with soprano Kiera Duffy. Closing the program, Jacobs joins an unorthodox ensemble including plumbers’ pipes and oxygen-tank bells for Lou Harrison’s Concerto for Organ and Percussion Orchestra.

    American Mavericks with Members of the San Francisco Symphony
    Friday, March 30, 8:30 p.m., Zankel Hall (881 Seventh Avenue, Manhattan)
    The final American Mavericks program by the San Francisco Symphony reflects the range of music that defines the maverick spirit with two New York premieres: Steve Reich’s pulsing, minimalist Music for Pieces of Wood, Echoi by experimental German-American composer Lukas Fos, Realm Variations by Meredith Monk, known for stretching the limits of the human voice, and Morton Subotnick’s Jacob’s Room: Monodrama (2012) performed by vocalist Joan La Barbara and musicians of the San Francisco Symphony conducted by Jeffrey Milarsky.


    ONGOING EVENTS
    The New York Public Library’s online multimedia initiative entitled John Cage Unbound—A Living Archive debuts in 2012, and features performance videos narrated by professional musicians, students, and others interested in contributing to the understanding of Cage’s philosophy and the process of interpreting his music. It is presented by the Library for the Performing Arts, which houses the John Cage Music Manuscript Collection, in association with The John Cage Trust and C. F. Peters Corporation.

    Throughout the month of March, WQXR, the country’s most listened-to classical music station, will present ambitious, multimedia-rich, interactive companion programming to deepen the experience of the live performances across the country. Q2 Music, WQXR’s New York-based online station devoted to new music, will become the digital hub for an in-depth exploration of what it means to be an American Maverick, including a wide array of musical offerings, archival interviews, guest curators, and events.

    Q2 Music’s month-long programming will also include pieces by American Maverick composers, with introductions to their works by composers David Del Tredici, Michael Gordon, Phil Kline, David Lang, Angelica Negron, Ingram Marshall, Missy Mazzoli, and Steve Reich; interviews from the WQXR and WNYC archives with iconic Maverick composers such as John Cage, Lukas Foss, Meredith Monk, and Terry Riley; insights about the music from MTT; and curated playlists from prominent composers and musicians outside the standard Western Classical tradition. Programming will be hosted by guest hosts including Mary Rowell, former ETHEL String Quartet violinist, and Joel Sachs, conductor of The New Juilliard Ensemble; Professor of Music History, Chamber Music, and New Music Performance at The Juilliard School; and biographer of Henry Cowell. Specialty shows with American Mavericks guests, American Mavericks videos, and videos from MTT will be hosted on the WQXR/Q2 Music site as well.

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    Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
    Ticket Information
    Tickets for American Mavericks events taking place at Carnegie Hall are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, carnegiehall.org.

    For tickets to American Mavericks partner events and Neighborhood Concerts, please contact the specific venue.

    For Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance or until supply lasts. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.

    In addition, for all Carnegie Hall presentations in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage a limited number of partial view (seats with obstructed or limited sight lines or restricted leg room) will be sold for 50% of the full price. For more information on this and other discount ticket programs, including those for students, Notables members, and Bank of America customers, visit carnegiehall.org/discounts
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