• Thursday, Jan 26, 2012

    Carnegie Hall Announces 2012-2013 Season

    Voices from Latin America Month-Long Citywide Festival Celebrating Latin American Music and Culture, Featuring Concerts at Carnegie Hall with Gustavo Dudamel, Gilberto Gil, and Chucho Valdés
    Perspectives: Renée Fleming Renowned Soprano Featured in Four Contrasting Events, Including Reprise of Her Role as Blanche DuBois in a Semi-Staged Performance of André Previn’s A Streetcar Named Desire
    Debs Composer’s Chair: Osvaldo Golijov Acclaimed Argentinean-American Composer Featured in Residency Culminating withLa Pasión según San Marcos Performed in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage by Robert Spano, Schola Cantorum de Venezuela, and NYC High School Chorus Members
    Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra Celebrated Orchestra Comprised of Musicians from Israel and Arab Countries Plays Complete Beethoven Symphony Cycle in Only US Appearances this Season
    Yannick Nézet-Séguin Makes Carnegie Hall Debut with Inaugural NYC Concerts as Music Director of The Philadelphia Orchestra;
    Pianist Jonathan Biss and Elias String Quartet in Programs of Mozart, Schumann, and Janácek;
    Belcea Quartet Performing Beethoven’s Late String Quartets; 
    Harry Bicket and The English Concert Launch Three-Season Focus on Handel Operas with Radamisto featuring David Daniels in Title Role; 
    The Academy’s Ensemble ACJW, with Concerts Conducted by Harry Bicket & Robert Spano
    Barbara Cook’s 85th Birthday Concert and Carnegie Hall Recital Debuts of Stephanie Blythe, Elina Garanca, and Daniil Trifonov  
    (NEW YORK)—Clive Gillinson, Executive and Artistic Director, today announced Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 season, consisting of over 170 performances and extensive education and community programs, featuring collaborations with many of the world’s greatest musicians and ensembles from the worlds of classical, pop, jazz, and world music, with performances presented on Carnegie Hall’s three stages and throughout New York City.

    Mr. Gillinson announced a number of programming highlights for 2012–2013, including Voices from Latin America, a month-long citywide festival, running from November 8 to December 11, celebrating the remarkable variety of Latin American music and culture and its influence on US and global culture with dozens of events at Carnegie Hall and New York partner institutions. The festival includes performances by a wide variety of musical artists, including singer-songwriter and guitarist Gilberto Gil; jazz pianist and composer Chucho Valdés, and conductor Gustavo Dudamel with the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela.

    Highlights of the season also include a four-event Perspectives series curated by soprano Renée Fleming and a complete Beethoven symphony cycle performed by Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra over four concerts. Osvaldo Golijov has been appointed as holder of the Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair at Carnegie Hall for the season. As part of his composer residency, Mr. Golijov has also served as one of four artistic advisors for the Voices from Latin America festival, along with Gustavo Dudamel, Gilberto Gil, and Chucho Valdés.

    Three concerts by Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra launch Carnegie Hall’s season in October. The CSO’s Opening Night Gala concert program on October 3 features Orff’s spectacular oratorio, Carmina Burana, with Mr. Muti and the orchestra collaborating with the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Chicago Children’s Choir, and featured soloists.

    “With the 2012–2013 season, we’ve brought together many of the greatest musicians performing today to create a collection of concerts that explore ideas that captivate us, telling wonderful musical stories sure to engage listeners,” said Clive Gillinson, Carnegie Hall’s Executive and Artistic Director. “Through our wide-ranging Voices from Latin America festival, stretching throughout New York City, fascinating series with Renée Fleming and Osvaldo Golijov, concerts representing all musical genres, or through our comprehensive education and community programs that reach artists and people of all ages, we want Carnegie Hall to continue to be a place that draws people together, making an inspiring contribution to people’s lives through music.”


    2012–2013 Season Highlights Overview

    Carnegie Hall launches its 2012–2013 season on October 3 with a festive Opening Night Gala concert featuring the Chicago Symphony Orchestra led by Music Director Riccardo Muti in a performance of Carl Orff’s dramatic oratorio, Carmina Burana, featuring soloists soprano Maria Grazia Schiavo and countertenor Antonio Giovannini, joined by the Chicago Symphony Chorus and the Chicago Children’s Choir. Mr. Muti and the CSO return for two performances on consecutive evenings, including music by Wagner, Franck, Dvorák, Martucci, and Respighi, plus the New York premiere of Mason Bates’s Alternative Energy.

    Later in the fall, Carnegie Hall unveils Voices from Latin America, a citywide arts festival from November 8 through December 11, celebrating Latin American music, arts, and culture, and its influence on global culture. Developed under the guidance of four internationally-acclaimed musicians serving as artistic advisors—composer Osvaldo Golijov, conductor Gustavo Dudamel, jazz pianist and composer, Chucho Valdés, and singer-songwriter Gilberto Gil—the festival includes performances and events over 30 days at Carnegie Hall and partner cultural institutions, spanning music, dance, film, photography, and art exhibitions, including particular focuses on music of Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela, and Mexico.

    In addition to Voices from Latin America programs on Carnegie Hall’s stages and a series of free Neighborhood Concerts in community venues in all five boroughs of New York City, presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, performances and events at leading partner cultural institutions extend the festival throughout the city. Festival partners are: Americas Society, Ballet Hispanico, Celebrate México Now, Cinema Tropical, The Juilliard School, Keyes Art Projects, The King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center at New York University, El Museo del Barrio, New York Public Library, 92YTribeca, The Paley Center for Media, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Pregones Theater, Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church, and Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Gardens, among others.

    Carnegie Hall’s Perspectives series of artist-curated programs continues in the new season, with soprano Renée Fleming offering four contrasting events that showcase her multifaceted talents. Ms. Fleming’s Perspectives includes collaborations with some of her favorite fellow artists, including mezzo-soprano Susan Graham, tenor Anthony Dean Griffey, and conductors Alan Gilbert and Patrick Summers. As part of the series, she sings a wide variety of repertoire including works written for her by Anders Hillborg and André Previn, among others, including a return to the role of Blanche DuBois that she created in Previn’s opera, A Streetcar Named Desire.

    Composer Osvaldo Golijov has been named as holder of Carnegie Hall’s Debs Composer’s Chair for the 2012–2013 season. In addition to his advisory role for Carnegie Hall’s Voices from Latin America festival, Mr. Golijov’s music is featured in four concerts beginning in January 2013, including the New York premieres of his Violin Concerto and the string quartet Qohelet, given by Leonidas Kavakos with The Philadelphia Orchestra and Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin and by the St. Lawrence String Quartet, respectively. Also featured is his song cycle Ayre (which had its world premiere in Zankel Hall in 2004), and two songs performed by Dawn Upshaw with the Crash Ensemble.

    Central to Mr. Golijov’s composer residency is a performance of his breakthrough work, La Pasión según San Marcos—its first in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage—125 New York City high school singers join conductor Robert Spano leading members of Orquesta La Pasión, the Schola Cantorum de Venezuela and its director Maria Guinand, as well as soprano Jessica Rivera and vocalist Luciana Souza, for the culminating performance of an extensive creative learning project for high school students, presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute.

    Other major season highlights: Daniel Barenboim conducts a complete Beethoven symphony cycle in four concerts by the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, an ensemble he co-founded in 1999, composed of musicians from Israel and Arab countries; three inaugural New York performances by The Philadelphia Orchestra under new Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, in his Carnegie Hall debut, with programs featuring Verdi’s Requiem, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, and more; Valery Gergiev leads the World Orchestra for Peace in its first New York performance, joined by soprano Dame Kiri Te Kanawa and bass René Pape, for The Solti Centennial Concert; and countertenor David Daniels singing the title role in Radamisto, the first of three annual concert performances of Handel operas and oratorios in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage by The English Concert and Harry Bicket.

    In addition, the season features the Belcea Quartet, exploring Beethoven’s late string quartets performed over three concerts; three chamber music programs centered on music by Mozart, Schumann, and Janácek by pianist Jonathan Biss and the Elias String Quartet; Carnegie Hall recital debuts of mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, mezzo-soprano Elina Garanca, and pianist Daniil Trifonov in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage; and the 85th Birthday Concert by acclaimed American singer Barbara Cook.

    Robert Spano and Harry Bicket each serve as guest conductors of Ensemble ACJW (comprised of the fellows of The Academy) for Zankel Hall performances, part of the group’s series of fresh and innovative concerts, which next season includes premieres of new works by Missy Mazzoli and Samuel Carl Adams, both commissioned by Carnegie Hall.

    Spring for Music—the critically-acclaimed festival of concerts by North American orchestras presented in partnership with Carnegie Hall returns for its third season in May 2013 with six orchestras presenting interesting and innovative programs. Featured orchestras include: Albany Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, and Oregon Symphony.

    The comprehensive music education and community programs of Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute continue to grow, with many programs integrated into Carnegie Hall’s concert programming. Following its creative learning project performance of Golijov’s La Pasión según San Marcos in March 2013, WMI presents its National High School Choral Festival in April, uniting top choirs from around the country for a culminating performance of Mozart’s Requiem; and also presents Family Concerts at Carnegie Hall throughout the season. In addition, WMI Professional Training Workshops and master classes for young musicians are led by the Takács Quartet; composer John Adams and conductor David Robertson; and flutist Emmanuel Pahud. The Song Continues…, Marilyn Horne’s series devoted to the art of the vocal recital, returns next season with public master classes led by Ms. Horne, soprano Jessye Norman, and pianist Dalton Baldwin. In the community: WMI presents dozens of free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts in community venues in all five boroughs of New York City, including free Community Sings and McGraw-Hill CarnegieKids interactive performances, designed especially for families.

    Thanks to a continued partnership with WQXR, twelve live performances from Carnegie Hall will be heard by radio and online listeners worldwide in the 2012–2013 season, presented as part of the Carnegie Hall Live broadcast and digital series.

    For the eighth consecutive year, Bank of America will be Carnegie Hall’s season sponsor. “We’re very proud to continue our partnership with Bank of America in this coming season,” said Mr. Gillinson. “Their support plays a vital role in helping us to create special performances by internationally-acclaimed artists that thrill our audiences, develop broad-reaching music education and community performances that connect with people from all walks of life throughout New York City and the US, and to realize dream projects like the Voices from Latin America festival which will bring people together citywide to enjoy and explore.”

    “We are honored and thrilled to enter our eighth season as a sponsor of Carnegie Hall and look forward to the array of creative performances that will delight audiences,” said Rena DeSisto, Global Arts and Culture Executive for Bank of America. “Bank of America supports more than 5,000 arts institutions around the world each year. Our support of the arts engages individuals, organizations, and cultures in creative ways to build mutual respect and insight. When we invest in the arts, we strengthen institutions that in turn contribute to local economies and we expand access to experiences that challenge, educate, inspire, and motivate.”


    Voices from Latin America

    From November 8 to December 11, 2012, Carnegie Hall presents Voices from Latin America, a citywide festival inviting audiences to explore the incredibly diverse music and culture of Latin America and its influence on the US and the world. Developed with the guidance of four internationally-acclaimed musicians serving as artistic advisors—composer Osvaldo Golijov, conductor Gustavo Dudamel, jazz pianist and composer, Chucho Valdés, and singer-songwriter and guitarist Gilberto Gil—the Voices from Latin America festival includes more than 60 performances and events at Carnegie Hall and partner cultural institutions, including particular focuses on music of Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela, and Mexico.

    Voices from Latin America features performances by artists representing a variety of different musical traditions. Three of the festival’s artistic advisors have curated series of concerts that spotlight their own musical cultures: Gilberto Gil, looking at Brazilian popular music; Chucho Valdés, exploring the development of Afro-Cuban jazz; and conductor Gustavo Dudamel, focusing on the influential El Sistema movement in Venezuela, including an extended New York residency by the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela. Carnegie Hall also partners with Celebrate México Now—the annual festival of Mexican art and culture in New York City—to present festival programs focusing on the music and culture of Mexico, culminating with a tribute to legendary singer Chavela Vargas in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage. Overall, Voices from Latin America offers a wide range of music including popular Brazilian styles such as samba, forró, música popular brasiliera (MPB), and other traditional music from Northeastern Brazil; Cuban rumba, Afro-Cuban jazz; and rancheras and other genres of Mexican song, plus classical music from a variety of Latin American composers.

    Through collaborations with other prestigious cultural institutions and a series of free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts in community venues, the reach of the festival extends throughout all five boroughs of New York City, spanning different art forms, including music, dance, film, panel discussions, and photography and art exhibitions, providing insight into diverse Latin American cultures that continue to fuel the world’s imagination. Voices from Latin America partners include: Americas Society, Ballet Hispanico, Celebrate México Now, Cinema Tropical in partnership with 92YTribeca, The Juilliard School, Keyes Art Projects, The King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center at New York University, El Museo del Barrio, New York Public Library, The Paley Center for Media, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Pregones Theater, Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church, and Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Gardens, among others.

    A complete schedule for Voices from Latin America will be announced in summer 2012. Tied to the festival, Carnegie Hall has launched a special web site: carnegiehall.org/LatinAmerica. This online companion site will feature up-to-date information on festival events, interviews with artists, videos, slideshows, and other content providing insight into Voices from Latin America festival offerings.


    Perspectives: Renée Fleming

    After nearly 40 performances at Carnegie Hall, renowned soprano Renée Fleming curates a four-event Perspectives series, showcasing her multifaceted talents and collaborating with some of her favorite fellow artists, including mezzo-soprano Susan Graham, tenor Anthony Dean Griffey, and conductors Alan Gilbert and Patrick Summers. As part of the series, Ms. Fleming sings a wide variety of repertoire that includes works written for her by Anders Hillborg and André Previn.

    Ms. Fleming’s Perspectives begins in January 2013, when she appears in recital in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage with her frequent operatic co-star and close friend, mezzo-soprano Susan Graham. She returns in March as Blanche DuBois in a one-night-only, semi-staged version of André Previn’s 1998 opera A Streetcar Named Desire, returning to a role that she originated in the work’s world premiere. Directed by Brad Dalton, the cast also features tenor Anthony Dean Griffey, returning in the role of Mitch; baritone Teddy Tahu Rhodes as Stanley; soprano Susanna Phillips as Stella; and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s conducted by Patrick Summers. Appearing in April with the New York Philharmonic and Music Director Alan Gilbert, Ms. Fleming sings the world premiere of a song cycle by Swedish composer Anders Hillborg, commissioned by Carnegie Hall and the New York Philharmonic. She completes her Perspectives series in May with a special program entitled Vienna: Window to Modernity, a tribute to the music of an era that helped make the Austrian capital a vibrant place for the arts.


    The Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair at Carnegie Hall, 2012–2013 Season

    Argentinean-American composer Osvaldo Golijov has been appointed to hold the Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair at Carnegie Hall for the 2012–2013 season. In addition to this residency, he also serves as one of four artistic advisors for Carnegie Hall’s Voices from Latin America festival in November and December 2012. Mr. Golijov—along with Gustavo Dudamel, Gilberto Gil, and Chucho Valdés—has provided invaluable counsel in shaping the direction and programming of the festival.

    At the heart of Mr. Golijov’s composer residency is a performance of his La Pasión según San Marcos, the acclaimed work that launched him to international prominence when it premiered in Stuttgart in 2000. Commissioned as a contemporary Passion to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Bach’s death, the stunning oratorio tells the story of Christ’s final days and draws on the sounds of Latin America—including Mr. Golijov’s native Argentina—to set texts in Spanish, Latin, and Aramaic, before closing with a haunting Kaddish, the Jewish prayer for the dead. The piece is percussive, often theatrical, vividly evocative, and entirely characteristic of Mr. Golijov’s personal aesthetic. For this performance in March—its first in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage—125 New York City high school singers join with members of Schola Cantorum de Venezuela and its director Maria Guinand (for whom the work was written), as well as soprano Jessica Rivera and vocalist Luciana Souza, in the culminating performance of an extensive creative learning project for high school students, presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute. Robert Spano, a frequent collaborator of Mr. Golijov’s, conducts the performance.

    Preceding this event, concerts in January and February feature the New York premieres of works by Mr. Golijov, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall: Leonidas Kavakos performing the composer’s Violin Concerto with The Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin; and the St. Lawrence String Quartet (with whom Mr. Golijov first collaborated in 1992) in the premiere of his string quartet Qohelet on a Making Music program. The Making Music program also includes Ayre, his collection of folk-inspired songs that range from tender to raucous, a past Carnegie Hall commission. Another frequent Golijov performer, soprano Dawn Upshaw, performs two of his songs later in the season—“Lúa Descolorida” and “How Slow the Wind”—with the Crash Ensemble led by conductor Alan Pierson.

    Previous holders of The Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair at Carnegie Hall are Kaija Saariaho (2011–2012), Brad Mehldau (2010–2011), Louis Andriessen (2009–2010), Elliott Carter (2008–2009), Thomas Adès (2007–2008), John Adams (2003–2007), Pierre Boulez (1999–2003), and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich (1995–1999).


    West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and Daniel Barenboim

    In late January and early February, acclaimed conductor Daniel Barenboim leads a complete Beethoven symphony cycle over four concerts at Carnegie Hall, performed by the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra—the ensemble that he co-founded, comprising musicians from Israel and Arab countries throughout the Middle East. The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra last appeared in New York at Carnegie Hall in 2006. Mr. Barenboim previously conducted a hugely successful Beethoven cycle at Carnegie Hall in 2000 with the Staatskapelle Berlin.

    In 1999, Mr. Barenboim—together with the late Palestinian literary scholar Edward Said—created a workshop for young musicians from countries throughout the Middle East, seeking to enable intercultural dialogue and creating an opportunity to collaborate on a matter of common interest: music making at the highest level. Mr. Barenboim and Mr. Said named the orchestra and workshop after German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s collection of poems entitled West-Eastern Divan, which they considered to be a central work for the evolution of the concept of world culture. The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra’s first sessions took place in Weimar (1999 and 2000) and Chicago (2001). In 2002, the workshop found a permanent home in Seville, Spain, where it is generously supported by the regional government of Andalusia. An equal number of Israeli and Arab musicians today form the base of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, together with a group of Spanish musicians. They meet each summer in Seville for a workshop, where rehearsals are complemented by lectures and discussions, then followed by an international concert tour. Since the orchestra’s inception, it was regularly appeared at prestigious music venues and festivals around the world.


    The Academy—2012–2013 Season Highlights

    Twenty new fellows join The Academy at the start of the 2012–2013 season. As part of the critically acclaimed Ensemble ACJW, they collectively perform many concerts at Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and other venues throughout New York City, including a series at (Le) Poisson Rouge in Greenwich Village with programs conceived by the fellows themselves. Some program highlights of Ensemble ACJW’s six Carnegie Hall concerts next season include two Zankel Hall programs led by early-music specialist and artistic director of The English Concert Harry Bicket and Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Music Director Robert Spano. Mr. Bicket conducts the musicians in works by Bach, Gluck, and Jean-Fery Rebel, with soprano Lucy Crowe as guest soloist; Mr. Spano leads the group in Messiaen’s Des canyons aux étoiles…. Other music to be heard on Ensemble ACJW programs next season ranges from Tchaikovsky, Dvorák, and Schubert to premieres of new works by Samuel Carl Adams and Missy Mazzoli, commissioned by Carnegie Hall. The musicians of The Academy also continue their work in New York City public schools, with each fellow paired up with an instrumental music teacher for a performance residency throughout the year.


    Created in 2007 by Carnegie Hall’s Executive and Artistic Director Clive Gillinson and The Juilliard School’s President Joseph Polisi, The Academy—a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education—supports young professional musicians in developing careers as top-quality performers, innovative programmers, and dedicated teachers who are fully engaged with the communities in which they live and work. For more information, visit acjw.org.

    Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute—2012–2013 Concert Season Highlights

    The comprehensive music education and community programs of Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute continue to grow, with many programs integrated into Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 concert programming.

    Following its creative learning project performance of Golijov’s La Pasión según San Marcos in March 2013, WMI presents its National High School Choral Festival in April, uniting top choirs from around the country for a culminating performance of Mozart’s Requiem with conductor John Nelson, professional soloists, and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, following a year of guided study. In addition, WMI Professional Training Workshops and master classes continue next season, offering young professional musicians (ages 18–35) the unique opportunity to explore aspects of music and interpretation with leading artists of our time. 2012–2013 PTWs and master classes will be led by the Takács Quartet; composer John Adams and conductor David Robertson; and flutist Emmanuel Pahud. In addition, The Song Continues…, Marilyn Horne’s series devoted to the art of the vocal recital, returns next season with performances and public master classes led by Ms. Horne, soprano Jessye Norman, and pianist Dalton Baldwin.

    WMI presents a series of interactive Family Concerts—designed for families with kids, ages 5–10—at Carnegie Hall throughout the year. In the community, WMI presents dozens of free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts, including free Community Sings and McGraw-Hill CarnegieKids interactive performances designed especially for families, in community venues in all five boroughs of New York City. In 2012–2013, this includes nine free Neighborhood Concerts as part of Carnegie Hall’s Voices from Latin America festival, including five performances by chamber groups drawn from the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela and four concerts by Mexican artists including jarocho virtuoso Celso Duarte; jazz singer Magos Herrera; son jarocho band Radio Jarocho performing traditional music from southern Veracruz; and Bandas de los Muertos playing Mexican brass band music.

    WMI’s extensive programs play a central role in Carnegie Hall’s commitment to making great music accessible to as many people as possible, annually serving more than 350,000 children, students, teachers, parents, young music professionals, and adults in the New York City metropolitan area and around the globe, with many educators and organizations taking advantage of WMI’s free online music education resources. For more information on WMI’s programs in the schools, in the community, and in support of the ongoing development of young artists, please visit carnegiehall.org/education.


    Live Radio Broadcasts from Carnegie Hall


    Throughout the 2012–2013 season, twelve Carnegie Hall concerts will be broadcast and streamed to a global audience, thanks to a continued partnership with WQXR.

    For a second year, Carnegie Hall and WQXR partner to produce Carnegie Hall Live, an engaging radio broadcast and digital series featuring twelve live performances by ensembles, soloists, and recitalists throughout Carnegie Hall’s season. Encouraging a sense of community and conversation around each performance, Carnegie Hall Live’s robust digital features include online chats, moderated by guest hosts on wqxr.org and carnegiehall.org. Tied to the broadcast series, live and on-demand audio, special videos featuring Carnegie Hall performers, program notes, photo galleries from each performance, and musical information are offered online. The full schedule of 2012–2013 Carnegie Hall Live broadcasts will be announced at a later date.


    Additional Carnegie Hall 2012–2013 Season Programming Highlights


    Commissions and Contemporary Music

    In 2012–2013, Carnegie Hall presents 35 new works in their New York, U.S., or world premieres, including 15 commissioned or co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall. As part of his Debs Composer Chair residency this season, audiences will hear the New York premieres of Osvaldo Golijov’s string quartet, Qohelet, written for the St. Lawrence String Quartet, and his Violin Concerto, performed by Leonidas Kavakos and The Philadelphia Orchestra led by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, both works co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall. Other Golijov works to be heard in the new season are his song cycle Ayre, his oratorio La Pasión según San Marcos, and two songs: “Lúa Descolorida” and “How Slow the Wind.”

    For the Voices from Latin America festival, Carnegie Hall has commissioned four composers, Esteban Benzecry of Argentina, Enrico Chapela of Mexico, Danilo Pérez of Panama, and Gonzalo Rubalcaba of Cuba, to write new works to be performed by members of the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela in Zankel Hall.

    Also, Swedish composer Anders Hillborg has been commissioned to write a new work for soprano Renée Fleming, who will give its world premiere with the New York Philharmonic and Music Director Alan Gilbert during her Carnegie Hall Perspectives series of concerts.

    The American Composers Orchestra returns in the 2012–2013 season for three Orchestra Underground concerts in Zankel Hall, the first conducted by José Serebrier and the last two led by ACO Music Director George Manahan. Music by Kyle Blaha, Milica Paranosic, Narong Prangcharoen, Kate Soper, Gabriela Lena Frank, Zhou Long, and José Serebrier will be heard on the first two programs, while the third will be an installment of ACO’s Playing It Unsafe program, with new pieces stretching the limits of what an orchestra can do.

    Other contemporary music highlights include Alarm Will Sound performing premieres by Tyondai Braxton, Donnacha Dennehy, John Orfe, and Steve Reich; a concert by Gabriel Kahane, performing originals and more with Shara Worden and Brooklyn Rider, including the world premiere of a new work commissioned by Carnegie Hall; the Crash Ensemble playing the music of Dennehy and Golijov; Kronos Quartet performing works all by woman composers, including Missy Mazzoli and Aleksandra Vrebalov; and commissions by Carnegie Hall for Ensemble ACJW of new music by Mazzoli and Samuel Carl Adams.

    Additional premieres include Mason Bates’s Alternative Energy performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Riccardo Muti; Harrison Birtwistle’s Gigue Machine performed by pianist Nicolas Hodges; Pavel Fischer’s Mad Piper performed by the Škampa Quartet; and new music from Samuel Carl Adams for the San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas; Timothy Andres for pianist Jonathan Biss and the Elias String Quartet; Marc-Andre Dalbavie for Magdalena Kožená and Yefim Bronfman; David Fulmer for violinist Stefan Jackiw and pianist Anna Polonsky; Steven Reineke for The New York Pops; Stephen Hough for his own piano recital; and Oliver Knussen for The Philadelphia Orchestra and Yannick Nézet-Séguin.


    Orchestras

    Carnegie Hall presents performances by ten American orchestras and eight international orchestras during the 2012–2013 season. Six additional American orchestras perform at the third annual Spring for Music festival in May 2013, presented in partnership with Carnegie Hall.

    The Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Music Director Riccardo Muti, open Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 season with a gala concert of Orff’s Carmina Burana featuring soprano Maria Grazia Schiavo and countertenor Antonio Giovannini, along with the Chicago Symphony Chorus and Chicago Children’s Choir. Maestro Muti and the orchestra return for two more performances on consecutive nights with programs to include music by Wagner, Dvorák, Respighi, Martucci, and Franck, plus the New York premiere of Mason Bates’s Alternative Energy.

    The Philadelphia Orchestra makes its first New York appearances led by new Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin in his Carnegie Hall debut. Maestro Nézet-Séguin’s inaugural programs as music director include Verdi’s Requiem, Ravel’s Piano Concerto with soloist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Stravinsky’s Le sacre du printemps, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, as well as the New York premieres of Osvaldo Golijov’s Violin Concerto with Leonidas Kavakos and a new work by Oliver Knussen. Sir Simon Rattle conducts Philadelphia’s fourth and final concert of the season, featuring Beethoven’s “Pastoral” Symphony and Ligeti’s Mysteries of the Macabre with soprano Barbara Hannigan.

    The Orchestra of St. Luke’s performs its annual three-concert Carnegie Hall series with programs to include: Nicholas McGegan conducting Haydn’s Cello Concerto in D Major with cellist Alisa Weilerstein; the orchestra’s new Principal Conductor Pablo Heras-Casado leading the orchestra with soloist Christian Zacharias in Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor; and Iván Fischer conducting Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion with soprano Dominique Labelle, tenor John Tessier, bass-baritone Hanno Müller-Brachmann, and Musica Sacra under the direction of Kent Tritle. The orchestra also performs in André Previn’s A Streetcar Named Desire as part of Ms. Fleming’s Perspectives series.

    The MET Orchestra also returns for their three-concert series at Carnegie Hall with soprano Eva-Maria Westbroek appearing as soloist in Wagner’s Wesendonck Lieder, led by conductor Semyon Bychkov; pianist Yefim Bronfman performing Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto and violinist David Chan performing Gubaidulina’s In tempus praesens, led by Fabio Luisi; and Evgeny Kissin as soloist in Grieg’s Piano Concerto.

    Other performance highlights with American orchestras: Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos and Daniele Gatti share conducting duties for three performances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra with pianist Garrick Ohlsson, mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, and mezzo-soprano Michelle DeYoung; Music Director Robert Spano conducts the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus in a program of choral blockbusters by Leonard Bernstein and William Walton; the San Francisco Symphony and Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas present two concerts with repertoire to include the New York premiere of a new work by Samuel Carl Adams, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 with Yuja Wang, and Mahler’s Symphony No. 9; Music Director Franz Welser-Möst leads The Cleveland Orchestra with repertoire to include music by Beethoven and Scriabin; the New York Philharmonic, led by Music Director Alan Gilbert, presents the world premiere of a song cycle by Anders Hillborg (commissioned by Carnegie Hall and the New York Philharmonic) as part of soprano Renée Fleming’s Perspectives series; and the New York String Orchestra returns for its two annual end-of-year concerts led by conductor Jamie Laredo, this season featuring pianist Jonathan Biss, cellist Cicely Parnas, and clarinetist Anthony McGill as soloists.

    Part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide Voices from Latin America festival, Music Director Gustavo Dudamel leads the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela in two consecutive evenings with programs including works by Esteban Benzecry, Carlos Chávez, Antonio Estévez, Julián Orbón, Silvestre Revueltas, and Heitor Villa-Lobos.

    Other major highlights with international orchestras: Two days before what would have been the late conductor Sir Georg Solti’s 100th birthday, the World Orchestra for Peace (founded by Sir Georg and comprised of the finest players drawn from top international orchestras) comes together for The Solti Centennial Concert, conducted by Valery Gergiev, hosted by Lady Solti, and featuring soloists soprano Dame Kiri Te Kanawa and bass René Pape in October Also, the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and Music Director Daniel Barenboim perform a complete cycle of Beethoven’s nine symphonies over four evenings in the orchestra’s only US appearances this season.

    Among early music or historically-informed ensembles, Harry Bicket conducts The English Concert in a concert version of Handel’s Radamisto with David Daniels in the title role. The performance is the first of three annual concerts of Handel operas and oratorios in concert by Mr. Bicket and his group at Carnegie Hall. Other soloists in Radamisto are soprano Brenda Rae, mezzo-soprano Patricia Bardon, baritone David Kravitz, and bass-baritone Luca Pisaroni, with additional artists to be announced. In addition, the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique returns to Carnegie Hall for two performances, continuing its exploration of Beethoven masterworks led by Artistic Director Sir John Eliot Gardiner. This season joined by The Monteverdi Choir and vocal soloists, the orchestra performs the composer’s Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt, Symphony No. 9, and Missa solemnis.

    Music Director Valery Gergiev leads the Mariinsky Orchestra in a program of Richard Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben and Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 6 in B Minor. Staatskapelle Dresden performs two concerts conducted by Christian Thielemann with music by Bruckner and Brahms, joined by soloist, violinist Lisa Batiashvili. And the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and Chief Conductor Mariss Jansons are featured in two programs of late Romantic works by Mahler, Richard Strauss, and Bruckner, with violinist Leonidas Kavakos as guest soloist in Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 2.

    Spring for Music, the critically acclaimed festival of concerts by North American orchestras presented in partnership with Carnegie Hall, returns for a third annual season in May 2013, with compelling and innovative programs by six orchestras: Albany Symphony, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, and Oregon Symphony. All tickets for Spring for Music are $25.


    Chamber Music

    Pianist Jonathan Biss embarks on a three-concert series next spring that focuses on the works of Schumann, Janácek, and Mozart, beginning with a solo recital and culminating in two performances with the Elias String Quartet. The quintet plays the New York premiere of a new work by Timothy Andres, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall as well as Janácek’s Concertino with clarinetist Carol McGonnell, horn player Eric Reed, and bassoonist Brad Balliet.

    Chamber music highlights of Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 season also include the Venezuelan Brass Ensemble, with members drawn from the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, in an evening of exuberant music-making as part of Carnegie Hall’s Voices from Latin America festival. In addition, Renée Fleming’s Perspectives series concludes with Vienna: Window to Modernity, a chamber music program exploring works written in Vienna during the 1900s with Ms. Fleming joined by other artists to be announced.

    Ensemble ACJW performs six times this season at Carnegie Hall, beginning in October with Tchaikovsky’s Souvenir de Florence. Other works programmed include Dvorák’s Piano Quintet in A Major, Schubert’s Octet in F Major, as well as the New York premieres of new works by Samuel Carl Adams and Missy Mazzoli, both commissioned by Carnegie Hall. Early-music specialist and artistic director of The English Concert Harry Bicket and Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Music Director Robert Spano each conduct the group in Zankel Hall concerts.

    The Belcea Quartet focuses on Beethoven’s late string quartets over three evenings, including both finales to the Quartet, Op. 130. The Škampa Quartet plays the New York premiere of Pavel Fischer’s Mad Piper on a program that also includes Mozart’s Quartet K. 589 and Dvorák’s “American” Quartet. Also featured in the new season are performances by the Apollon Musagete Quartet, Artemis Quartet, Brentano String Quartet, Jasper String Quartet, Miró Quartet, and the Philharmonia Quartett Berlin.

    Looking at early music, mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato presents a concert entitled Drama Queens, focusing on scenes that feature the queens of baroque operas by Handel, Monteverdi, Gluck, and others, with Alan Curtis leading his renowned international orchestra Il Complesso Barocco. Other early music programs and ensembles include harpsichordist Kristian Bezuidenhout in his New York recital debut in Weill Recital Hall; the British theatrical a cappella singing group I Fagiolini in a “musical feast” entitled Insalata I Fagiolini featuring imaginative stagings under the direction of Robert Hollingworth; Bernard Labadie leading Les Violons du Roy and flutist Emmanuel Pahud; Ensemble Matheus led by Director Jean-Christophe Spinosi; Trio Sonnerie under the direction of Monica Huggett; and the Venice Baroque Orchestra.


    Recitals/Vocal

    Vocal recital highlights of Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 season include Perspectives artist Renée Fleming in a duo vocal recital with mezzo-soprano Susan Graham and pianist Bradley Moore; mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe making her Carnegie Hall recital debut with pianist Warren Jones; mezzo-soprano Elina Garanca making her New York recital debut in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage; baritone Nathan Gunn collaborating with pianist Julie Gunn on a Zankel Hall program to include a new work performed with the Pacifica Quartet; mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kožená singing the New York premiere of a work by Marc-Andre Dalbavie (co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall) and more with pianist Yefim Bronfman; and soprano Marlis Petersen making her New York recital debut in Weill Recital Hall with pianist Jendrik Springer, performing a concert entitled Goethe and the Eternal-Feminine.

    The Song Continues…, a series of master classes and recitals led by acclaimed mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne, returns next season, with master classes led by soprano Jessye Norman, pianist Dalton Baldwin, and Ms. Horne. Additional Carnegie Hall recitalists include sopranos Susanna Phillips and Dorothea Röschmann; mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard; tenors Paul Appleby, Lawrence Brownlee, and Alek Shrader; and baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky.

    Among the vocal offerings next season, the celebrated vocal sextet The King’s Singers perform in Zankel Hall, displaying spot-on intonation, impeccable vocal blend, and trademark British wit as they present works by young and established composers.

    In piano recital highlights, Daniil Trifonov, Grand Prize Winner of the 2011 XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition, makes his New York recital debut in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage; Jonathan Biss launches his three-concert series of concerts this season with a solo recital featuring Schumann’s Davidsbündlertänze; Nicolas Hodges performs the New York premiere of Harrison Birtwistle’s Gigue Machine, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall; and Stephen Hough plays a new work that he has composed in memory of Benjamin Britten. Other pianists giving solo recitals next season are Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Piotr Anderszewski, Jeremy Denk, Till Fellner, Richard Goode, Evgeny Kissin, Radu Lupu, Murray Perahia, Maurizio Pollini, Alexandre Tharaud, Mitsuko Uchida, and Yuja Wang.

    Among instrumental recital highlights next year, Julia Fischer performs a recital of works for solo violin; Midori performs a violin recital with pianist Özgür Aydin; violinist Stefan Jackiw performs the world premiere of a new work by fellow violinist David Fulmer plus more with pianist Anna Polonsky; John Williams and John Etheridge perform an eclectic mix of music for duo guitar; and Argentinian cellist Sol Gabetta makes her New York recital debut with pianist Alessio Bax.


    Pop, Jazz, and World Music

    Popular music highlights during Carnegie Hall’s 2012–2013 concert season include six programs by The New York Pops under the baton of Music Director Steven Reineke. The orchestra opens its Carnegie Hall season with Some Enchanted Evening—a concert dedicated to the timeless music of Rodgers and Hammerstein featuring hits from musicals like Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, and The King and I sung by guest artists Aaron Lazar, Kelli O’Hara, and Paulo Szot. Other concerts this season include By Special Request: An Evening with the Orchestra, with the Pops performing favorite symphonic repertoire plus the world premiere of a new fanfare composed by Mr. Reineke; two holiday concerts with the eclectic Latin-, jazz-, and cabaret-influenced ensemble Pink Martini; an evening dedicated to renowned songwriter Sammy Cahn featuring comedian, cartoonist, and singer Seth MacFarlane; and a performance saluting the 65th birthday of composer Stephen Schwartz on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of his hit musical Wicked, with guest artists Norm Lewis, Julia Murney, and Jennifer Laura Thompson.

    Tony Award–winning singer, actress, and newly named 2011 Kennedy Center Honoree Barbara Cook celebrates her 85th birthday in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage with Musical Director Lee Musiker. Also appearing in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage is the ever witty and entertaining Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain—bringing their trademark high energy singing, ukulele strumming, and wit to Carnegie Hall for another virtuosic evening of musical entertainment.

    The annual three-concert series, Standard Time with Michael Feinstein, returns with singer/pianist Michael Feinstein exploring the American Songbook alongside special guest artists to be announced. Finally, returning for its eighth season of concerts celebrating singer-songwriters and the eclectic nature of modern folk music is the WFUV Live at Zankel series, curated by WFUV Music Director Rita Houston and Carnegie Hall. Performers for the series will be announced at a later date.

    Carnegie Hall presents three jazz concerts as part of its Voices from Latin America festival in November/December, representing the depth and breadth of Cuban jazz. The first is a double bill concert showcasing the future of Afro-Cuban jazz with rising stars who are currently at the forefront of the genre—Dayramir and Habana enTRANCE and the Aldo López-Gavilán Quartet. Also within the festival, multi–Grammy Award winner, pianist, composer, and bandleader Chucho Valdés—known to many as Cuba’s musical ambassador to the world—leads his quartet for an evening of jazz. Finally, four Latin American piano powerhouses—Egberto Gismonti of Brazil, Danilo Pérez of Panama, and Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Chucho Valdés of Cuba—join forces for one-night-only extravaganza that features a program of solos, duos, and quartets.

    Other jazz highlights during the 2012–2013 season include Grammy Award-winning jazz vocalist Dianne Reeves bringing her distinct vocal styling and improvisational skills to Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, joined by musical friends and contemporaries; and the Shape of Jazz series—presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment LLC and The Joyce and George Wein Foundation in memory of Joyce Wein—with performances by the 3 Cohens—clarinetist and tenor saxophonist Anat Cohen, and brothers saxophonist Avishai and trumpeter Yuval; as well as concerts by singer/violinist Jenny Scheinman; and jazz pianist and composer Vijay Iyer.

    World music performances featured as part of the Voices from Latin America festival include legendary Brazilian singer, guitarist, and songwriter Gilberto Gil in an evening of forró—infectious dance music from Northeastern Brazil; a special Tribute to Chavela Vargas by vocalists Ely Guerra, Eugenia León, and Tania Libertad in honor of the great Mexican ranchera singer’s legacy; an evening of sambas and choros by Paulinho da Viola, widely regarded as Brazil’s greatest living sambista, making his Carnegie Hall debut; and a concert by legendary folkloric group Yoruba Andabo (“friends of Yoruba culture”) performing Cuban rumba with singers, percussionists, and ecstatic percussion-driven dances that reveal the ongoing influence of African religion and traditions in contemporary Cuba. Also part of the festival are two double-bill concerts, both putting the spotlight on music from Brazil. The first, entitled Music from Northeastern Brazil, features virtuoso flutist and improviser Carlos Malta and Pife Muderno, a performer of traditional flute and drum music, followed by Os Cordestinos in a set of lively folk and contemporary music; the second double-bill of musical contrasts features Orquestra Imperial, a retro-chic homage to big bands from the 1950s, playing sambas and dance classics, after which poet and singer-songwriter Arnaldo Antunes performs an engaging acoustic set with guitar accompaniment. The Voices from Latin America festival also includes MPB: The New Generation, a concert featuring some of today’s best performers of MPB (música popular brasileira), a blend of bossa nova, samba, regional folk music, and rock ‘n’ roll.

    Additional world music highlights next season presented in partnership with the World Music Institute include exiled Zimbabwean singer and musician Thomas Mapfumo performing the Chimurenga (or “struggle” music), which he created and popularized; Alash—the Tuvan quartet of master throat singers—performing traditional music from that region; and Irish folk music sextet Altan performing a collection of songs and instrumental styles that range from sensitive and touching old Irish songs to hard hitting Irish reels and jigs.


    Carnegie Hall Partnerships
    The following organizations are artistic partners during the 2012–2013 season: Absolutely Live Entertainment LLC, Americas Society, Ballet Hispanico, Celebrate México Now, Chamber Music America's Cleveland Quartet Award, Cinema Tropical, El Museo del Barrio, The Joyce and George Wein Foundation in memory of Joyce Wein, The Juilliard School, Keyes Art Projects, The King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center at New York University, New York City Department of Education, New York Public Library, 92Y Tribeca, Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church, The Paley Center for Media, Pregones Theater, (Le) Poisson Rouge, Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Gardens, Spring for Music, WFUV, The World Orchestra for Peace, World Music Institute, and WQXR.

    Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.

    For complete 2012–2013 season information, including concert calendar, please visit carnegiehall.org.
     
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