• Thursday, Aug 23, 2012

    Carnegie Hall Receives $4 Million Grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

    Generous Two-Year Grant Supports Range of Artistic and Educational Initiatives, Including Citywide Carnegie Hall Festivals, Commissions of New Works, Radio and Digital Broadcasts of Carnegie Hall Performances, Conservation and Digitization of Historic Archival Collections, and Creation of New Online Music Education Resources
    (NEW YORK)—Carnegie Hall today announced that it has been awarded $4 million from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This generous grant will support a range of initiatives over the next two years, helping the Hall to continue building on its 121-year history of artistic and educational excellence as it continues to create new ways to serve today’s audiences, making great music accessible to as many people as possible.

    The Mellon Foundation will provide significant funding toward citywide Carnegie Hall festivals, including Voices from Latin America, a month-long celebration exploring the diverse music and cultures of Latin America with more than 70 events reaching audiences throughout New York City in November and December 2012. The gift will support commissions of more than 25 new musical works to be performed in future Carnegie Hall seasons and provide funding toward Carnegie Hall Live radio and digital broadcasts, programs produced in partnership with WQXR Radio that extend the reach of a variety of Carnegie Hall performances to listeners worldwide. Major support will be provided toward the Hall’s comprehensive Digital Archives Project, a multi-year initiative conserving and digitizing major paper and audiovisual holdings from Carnegie Hall’s Archives’ historic collections, making them increasingly accessible to the public, both on-site and online. The grant will also enable video capture of a series of Professional Training Workshops—in-depth, multi-day teaching sessions in New York with world-renowned artists, created by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute to serve young professional musicians—allowing enhanced educational materials to be made available for free to even more young musicians around the globe through WMI’s Online Resource Center.

    “We are enormously grateful for this inspiring support from The Mellon Foundation, which will have tremendous impact as we work to encourage audiences to expand their artistic horizons, serve a greater number of people through technology, and seek to play a role in supporting the future of music through education and the creation of new works,” said Clive Gillinson, executive and artistic director of Carnegie Hall. “With the collective impact of programs like these, we continue to reimagine what Carnegie Hall can mean in the twenty-first century, realizing the meaningful contributions it can make to people’s lives through music.”

    In recent years, The Mellon Foundation has partnered with Carnegie Hall on other major artistic and educational initiatives, including The Academy—a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education—a two-year fellowship that helps the finest young professional musicians to develop careers as top-quality performers, innovative programmers, and dedicated teachers fully engaged with their communities. The Foundation has also supported past Carnegie Hall festivals and planning work for the recently-established National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America, a new Weill Music Institute program that will invite talented young players (ages 16-19) from across the US to gather with their peers, a faculty of leading orchestral musicians and a different celebrated conductor each year for a two-week intensive summer residency in New York followed by an international tour. The NYO-USA makes its debut in summer 2013.


    About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, headquartered in New York City, makes grants principally in five core program areas: higher education and scholarship, libraries and scholarly communications, conservation and the environment, museums and art conservation, and performing arts. Within each of its core programs, the Foundation concentrates most of its grant making in a few areas. Institutions and programs receiving support are often leaders in their fields, but they may also be promising newcomers or in a position to demonstrate new ways of overcoming obstacles to achieve program goals. The Foundation’s grant making philosophy is to build, strengthen, and sustain institutions and their core capacities. As such, The Mellon Foundation develops thoughtful, long-term collaborations with grant recipients and invests sufficient funds for an extended period to accomplish the purpose at hand and achieve meaningful results.

    About Carnegie Hall
    Since 1891, New York City’s Carnegie Hall has set the international standard for musical excellence. From Tchaikovsky, Dvorák, Mahler, and Bartók to George Gershwin, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Judy Garland, and The Beatles, the best of every form of music has filled Carnegie Hall throughout its history.

    Carnegie Hall continues this tradition today, presenting hundreds of exceptional musical performances on its three stages—the renowned Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, the intimate Weill Recital Hall, and the innovative Zankel Hall—ranging from orchestral concerts, chamber music, and solo recitals to jazz, world, and popular music. Since 2007, partnerships with a variety of other New York cultural institutions have enabled Carnegie Hall to expand its artistic offerings with the creation of major citywide festivals, encompassing music and many other art forms, exploring compelling cultural themes.

    Broad-reaching music education and community programs and engaging online educational initiatives—all created by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute—serve more than 350,000 people of all ages annually in New York, across the US, and around the world. In addition to extensive programs that serve public schools in all five boroughs of New York City, WMI has increasingly made free curriculum materials and music education resources available across the country through its growing Link Up National program, which helps to connect more than 40 orchestras in the US and Canada with elementary schools in their respective local communities.

    In New York City, WMI brings people from all walks of life together through music, presenting dozens of free Neighborhood Concerts in community venues throughout New York City each season and regularly making free musical experiences and workshops available to people in need in healthcare settings, correctional facilities, senior-service organizations, and homeless centers. In addition to The Academy and WMI’s annual series of Professional Training Workshops, both of which serve professional artists, WMI has increasingly worked to motivate and inspire the development of young musicians across the country. Alongside the new National Youth Orchestra of the USA, WMI recently launched the Carnegie Hall Royal Conservatory Achievement Program, created in partnership with Canada’s Royal Conservatory, which provides a recognized set of standards and aspirational, sequenced course of study for music students at all levels throughout the US.

    For more information on Carnegie Hall’s artistic and educational initiatives, please visit carnegiehall.org.

     
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