Carnegie Hall Presents

Chamber Sessions II

The tremendous variety of chamber music is on display in this series. Hear a piano duo perform Bartók with percussionists, and a string quartet improvise on jazz riffs; a violinist and pianist team up for Beethoven’s “Kreutzer” Sonata, and a chamber orchestra present a New York premiere with one of today’s favorite sopranos.

Leonidas Kavakos
Enrico Pace

András Schiff
Dénes Várjon

Ebène Quartet

Australian Chamber Orchestra

Leonidas Kavakos
Enrico Pace

Zankel Hall
Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Leonidas Kavakos, Violin
Enrico Pace, Piano

Program

PROKOFIEV Violin Sonata No. 1
LERA AUERBACH Selections from Preludes for Violin and Piano, Op. 46
No. 1 in C Major: Adagio
No. 18 in F Minor: Agitato
No. 19 in E-flat Major: Moderato
No. 20 in C Minor: Tragico
No. 12 in G-sharp Minor: Adagio
No. 14 in E-flat Minor: Presto
No. 15 in C-sharp Major: Adagio sognando
No. 16 in B-flat Minor: Misterioso
No. 23 in F Major: Andante
No. 24 in D Minor: Presto
BEETHOVEN Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 9 in A Major, Op. 47, "Kreutzer"

Encore:STRAVINSKY Danse Russe from Pétrouchka (trans. Dushkin)
Leonidas Kavakos, “astonishingly virtuosic and blazingly insightful” (Guardian) and Enrico Pace, winner of the International Liszt Piano Competition, appear onstage as “a study in contrast, like the Odd Couple, but together these two opposites make magic” (The Buffalo News). They’ve been bringing down houses together since 2006, and this season they come to Carnegie Hall in a recital that is bound to astound.

Listen

Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 9 In A "Kreutzer", Op. 47: I. (Adagio Sostenuto - Presto)


Fritz Kreisler, Violin; Franz Rupp, Piano
EMI Classics

András Schiff
Dénes Várjon

Zankel Hall
Saturday, February 25, 2012 | 7:30 PM

Performers

András Schiff, Piano
Dénes Várjon, Piano
David Skidmore, Percussion
James Michael Deitz, Percussion

Program

SCHUMANN (ARR. DEBUSSY) Six Etudes in Canonic Form
GYÖRGY KURTÁG GYÖRGY KURTÁG Selections from Játékok
·· Fog Canon
·· Furious Chorale
·· Bells (Homage to Stravinsky)
·· Homage to Halmágyi Mihály
DEBUSSY En blanc et noir
BARTÓK Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion
András Schiff’s Carnegie Hall Perspectives residency focuses on Bartók, and on this concert he teams up with Dénes Várjon to perform the Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion—one of the composer’s most popular works. In addition, Schiff and Várjon perform Debussy’s En blanc et noir, which alternates between passionate extroversion and somber reflection.

Ebène Quartet

Zankel Hall
Sunday, March 18, 2012 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Ebène Quartet
·· Pierre Colombet, Violin
·· Gabriel Le Magadure, Violin
·· Mathieu Herzog, Viola
·· Raphaël Merlin, Cello

Program

MOZART String Quartet in D Minor, K. 421
BEETHOVEN String Quartet in C-sharp Minor, Op. 131
Jazz and Pop Improvisations
While the group’s name means ebony, reflecting what violinist Gabriel Le Magadure calls “a love and respect for great African American jazz musicians,” the Ebène Quartet applies passionate intensity to all types of music. On this program, hear this stunning group perform jazz improvisations, but also music by Mozart and Beethoven.

Listen

Misirlou (from Pulp Fiction)


Ebène Quartet
Virgin

Australian Chamber Orchestra

Zankel Hall
Monday, April 30, 2012 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Australian Chamber Orchestra
Richard Tognetti, Artistic Director
Dawn Upshaw, Soprano

Program

WEBERN Five Movements, Op. 5
GEORGE CRUMB Selections from Black Angels
MARIA SCHNEIDER Winter Morning Walks (NY Premiere)
SCHUMANN "Mondnacht," Op. 39, No. 5 (arr. Tognetti)
SCHUBERT "Geheimes," D. 719 (arr. Brahms)
SCHUBERT "Der Tod und das Mädchen" ("Death and the Maiden"), D. 531(arr. Tognetti)
GRIEG String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 27 (arr. Tognetti)

Encore:WALTON Allegro molto from Sonata for String Orchestra
Join Dawn Upshaw, Richard Tognetti, and his “badass classical band” (Time Out New York), the Australian Chamber Orchestra for the New York premiere of Winter Morning Walks, written by New York–based jazz composer Maria Schneider expressly for Upshaw and this orchestra. Inspired by her native Midwest, the composer says the piece strives for “broad openness with an accessible, simple beauty.”