Carnegie Hall Presents

Thrilling Symphonies, Hidden Turmoil

Every symphony, its own complex and riveting adventure: Three of the world’s finest orchestras lead you through tumultuous works by Beethoven, Mahler, and Shostakovich.
 

Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique

Boston Symphony Orchestra

New York Philharmonic

Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, November 17, 2011 | 8 PM

Performers

Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique
Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Artistic Director and Conductor

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN PROGRAM Overture to Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus
Symphony No. 3, "Eroica"
Symphony No. 4
After hearing this period-instrument ensemble and its dynamic leader perform Beethoven, you’ll never think about the composer the same way again. That was the consensus when they released their thrilling recording of the composer’s symphonies back in 1994, and it’s a sentiment you’re sure to hold after this final concert of the orchestra’s two-night all-Beethoven residency.

Listen

Mozart Symphony No.5 (Allegro Con Brio)


Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique; Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Conductor
Archiv

Boston Symphony Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Friday, March 9, 2012 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Stéphane Denève, Conductor
Peter Serkin, Piano

Program

RAVEL Ma Mère l'Oye (Mother Goose) Suite
STRAVINSKY Concerto for Piano and Winds
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5
The Boston Symphony Orchestra closes out its three-night stay at Carnegie Hall with the tuneful populism of Shostakovich’s best-known symphony. Premiered in 1937, the Fifth put the composer back in the good graces of Stalin and the Communist government, which had banned his notorious opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk the previous year and had always viewed Shostakovich as something of a troublemaker.

New York Philharmonic

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 | 8 PM

Performers

New York Philharmonic
Alan Gilbert, Music Director and Conductor

Program

MAHLER Symphony No. 6
With imperious march music, moments of pastoral repose (complete with cowbells), and heaven-storming passages overflowing with joy, Mahler’s Sixth is a tumultuous whirlwind of musical extremes. Alan Gilbert leads the New York Philharmonic in the work that he has called his favorite Mahler symphony, a “powerful expression of life’s experiences.”

Listen

Mahler Symphony No. 6, "Tragic" (Allegro)


New York Philharmonic; Leonard Bernstein, Conductor
Sony