Carnegie Hall Presents

Chamber Sessions I

Sterling ensembles and maverick musicians shed new light on quintessential works from the string repertoire. The Tetzlaff Quartet interprets Haydn, Bartók, and Beethoven; the Takács Quartet embarks on a complete cycle of Bartók’s string quartets; Leonidas Kavakos and Enrico Pace chart a course through Beethoven’s complete sonatas for violin and piano; and Ensemble ACJW performs under the baton of David Robertson.

Tetzlaff Quartet

Ensemble ACJW

Takács Quartet

Leonidas Kavakos
Enrico Pace

Tetzlaff Quartet

Zankel Hall
Thursday, October 24, 2013 | 7 PM

Performers

Tetzlaff Quartet
·· Christian Tetzlaff, Violin
·· Elisabeth Kufferath, Violin
·· Hanna Weinmeister, Viola
·· Tanja Tetzlaff, Cello

Program

HAYDN String Quartet in C Major, Op. 20, No. 2
BARTÓK String Quartet No. 4
BEETHOVEN String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 132

Encore:HAYDN Menuet: Allegretto from String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 20, No. 3
Acclaimed for their ability to maintain individual personality amidst a perfectly unified ensemble, the members of the Tetzlaff Quartet have become highly demanded as solo artists and for their chamber work together. Guided by violinist Christian Tetzlaff’s superlative technique and intensity, the group has been praised for playing “a dazzling palette of sounds, roaring like a full symphony or whispering at near-inaudibility” (The Washington Post). The ensemble comes to Carnegie Hall to play a recital of classic quartets by Haydn, Bartók, and Beethoven.

Listen

Beethoven's String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 132 (Molto adagio—Andante)

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Cleveland Quartet
Telarc

Ensemble ACJW

The Academy—a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education

Zankel Hall
Saturday, December 14, 2013 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Ensemble ACJW
David Robertson, Conductor
Dawn Upshaw, Soprano

Program

BERIO Folk Songs
STEVE REICH City Life
BARTÓK Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta
“Both as an experienced and persuasive new-music conductor and as an insightful interpreter of the standard canon” (The New York Times), conductor David Robertson captures the attention of audiences whenever he stands at the podium. Few maestros are as energetic, vital, or riveting as Robertson, who has served as a champion of young musicians throughout his career. He returns to Carnegie Hall to lead an inventive program of music by Steve Reich, Bartók, and Berio with soprano Dawn Upshaw and Ensemble ACJW, a remarkable group of young professional musicians.

The contemporary work on this program is part of My Time, My Music.

Takács Quartet

Zankel Hall
Saturday, January 18, 2014 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Takács Quartet
·· Edward Dusinberre, Violin
·· Károly Schranz, Violin
·· Geraldine Walther, Viola
·· András Fejér, Cello

Program

ALL-BARTÓK PROGRAM
String Quartet No. 1
String Quartet No. 3
String Quartet No. 5
Bartók has been a staple of the Takács Quartet’s repertory for decades, with the group's affinity for his music evidenced in each breathtaking performance. Having been hailed for uniquely capturing all of the textural elements of the composer's string quartets, “from the explosively energetic to the grimly sardonic, incorporated into a single, magnificent musical span” (The Guardian), the revered quartet embarks on a cycle of these works with this program of odd numbered quartets from the early, middle, and late periods of Bartók’s canon.

Listen

Bartók's String Quartet No. 3 (Moderato)

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Takács Quartet
Decca

Leonidas Kavakos
Enrico Pace

Zankel Hall
Sunday, March 2, 2014 | 7:30 PM

Performers

Leonidas Kavakos, Violin
Enrico Pace, Piano

Program

BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 6 in A Major, Op. 30, No. 1
BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 12, No. 3
BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 7 in C Minor, Op. 30, No. 2

Encore:SCHUBERT Andantino from Sonata for Violin and Piano in A Major, D. 574, "Duo"
Playing with a “balance of pyrotechnics and lyricism” (The New York Times), spirited violinist Leonidas Kavakos has established himself as an artist who not only plays music, but expressively inhabits it. He embarks on a complete survey of Beethoven’s violin sonatas with pianist Enrico Pace in this program—the first of three evenings—that showcases the ample range of characters, techniques, and styles in these lauded works.