Carnegie Hall Presents

Great American Orchestras I

The artistic brilliance of these four American orchestras makes this series essential for lovers of great orchestral music. The San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas spotlight the visceral excitement of music by Prokofiev and Ravel, while Riccardo Muti leads the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in sumptuous works by Mendelssohn, Debussy, and Scriabin. The St. Louis Symphony, led by David Robertson, performs favorites by Debussy and Tchaikovsky, and also the New York premiere a work by Meredith Monk. The Boston Symphony and new Music Director Andris Nelsons make their mark in Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 6.

San Francisco Symphony

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

St. Louis Symphony

Boston Symphony Orchestra

San Francisco Symphony

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, November 20, 2014 | 8 PM

Performers

San Francisco Symphony
Michael Tilson Thomas, Music Director and Conductor
Gil Shaham, Violin
New York Choral Artists
Joseph Flummerfelt, Chorus Director

Program

SAMUEL ADAMS Drift and Providence (NY Premiere)
PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2
RAVEL Daphnis et Chloé (complete)
A French ballet written for a Russian impresario and a Russian concerto written for a French soloist are featured. Ravel’s score for Daphnis et Chloé, commissioned by Russian dance impresario Sergei Diaghilev, is a masterpiece of spectacular orchestral colors, exotic harmonies, and stirring rhythms. Prokofiev’s Violin Concerto No. 2 was written for one of Ravel’s frequent collaborators, violinist Robert Soetens. Irresistibly lyrical, especially in the unaccompanied violin passage that opens the work and the gorgeous second-movement melody, Prokofiev closes the concerto with virtuoso fireworks.

The contemporary work on this program is part of My Time, My Music.

Listen

Ravel's Daphnis et Chloé: Danse religieuse

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Berliner Philharmoniker | Pierre Boulez, Conductor
Deutsche Grammophon

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Friday, January 30, 2015 | 8 PM

Performers

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti, Music Director and Conductor

Program

MENDELSSOHN Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture
DEBUSSY La mer
SCRIABIN Symphony No. 3, "The Divine Poem"
Its lush harmonies and shimmering orchestral colors makes Debussy’s La mer one of the great musical portraits of the sea and among the most popular works in the orchestral repertoire. Scriabin’s newfound mysticism and fascination with touching all the senses in a musical work is at the core of his Symphony No. 3, “The Divine Poem.” The extravagantly scored symphony has an intoxicating richness of sound.

Listen

Debussy's La Mer (Jeux De Vagues, Allegro)

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Chicago Symphony Orchestra | Fritz Reiner, Conductor
MusiKazoo

St. Louis Symphony

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Friday, March 20, 2015 | 8 PM

Performers

St. Louis Symphony
David Robertson, Music Director and Conductor
Katie Geissinger, Mezzo-Soprano
Theo Bleckmann, Baritone
Members of the St. Louis Symphony Chorus
Amy Kaiser, Director

Program

DEBUSSY Nocturnes
MEREDITH MONK WEAVE (NY Premiere)
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 4
A passionate symphony by Tchaikovsky, Debussy’s lushly scored Nocturnes, and the New York premiere of WEAVE, a work by Meredith Monk, holder of the 2014–2015 Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair, showcases the St. Louis Symphony and Music Director David Robertson’s mastery of a vast range of repertoire. Written during a tempestuous time in Tchaikovsky’s life, his Fourth Symphony reflects that tumult, melodically splendid and vibrantly orchestrated; it’s one of his most popular symphonies.

The contemporary work on this program is part of My Time, My Music.

Boston Symphony Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Friday, April 17, 2015 | 8 PM

Performers

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Andris Nelsons, Music Director and Conductor

Program

MAHLER Symphony No. 6
The original version of the finale of Mahler's Sixth Symphony included three hammer strokes of fate that presaged tragedies in the composer's life: the diagnosis of a heart condition that would prove fatal, the loss of his position at the Vienna State Opera, and the death of his daughter. Superstitious, Mahler eventually removed the third stroke. But he also included a magnificently melodic Adagio and a rapturous theme that represents his wife, Alma.

Listen

Mahler's Symphony No. 6 (Allegro energico, ma non troppo)

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Boston Symphony Orchestra | Seiji Ozawa, Conductor
Universal International Music