Carnegie Hall Presents

The MET Orchestra

The MET Orchestra’s virtuosity and James Levine’s mastery of seemingly limitless repertoire result in some of the most compelling music making of our time. Levine is on the podium for three concerts. He conducts Mahler’s elegiac Symphony No. 9 in a program that opens with the legendary Maurizio Pollini playing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21. Mezzo-soprano Elīna Garanča sings Berg in a concert that also features music by Beethoven, Carter, and Schumann. To conclude the series, the orchestra plays Berlioz’s hallucinogenic Symphonie fantastique and Yefim Bronfman performs Brahms’s First Piano Concerto.

The MET Orchestra

The MET Orchestra

The MET Orchestra

The MET Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Sunday, October 12, 2014 | 3 PM

Performers

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Maurizio Pollini, Piano

Program

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K. 467
MAHLER Symphony No. 9
Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21 gained even greater fame when its beautiful slow movement was used in the soundtrack of the film Elvira Madigan. But the concerto also charms with its regal opening movement and its boisterous finale. Mahler’s last recorded words were “little Mozart,” but his Symphony No. 9 seems far removed from Mozart’s world with its ethereal romantic spirits.

Listen

Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K. 467 (Andante)


Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra | Maurizio Pollini, Piano
Deutsche Grammophon

The MET Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Sunday, February 8, 2015 | 3 PM

Performers

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Anna Netrebko, Soprano

Program

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 2
DVOŘÁK "Song to the Moon" from Rusalka
R. STRAUSS "Cäcilie," Op. 27, No. 2
CARTER Three Illusions
SCHUMANN Symphony No. 2
Please note that Elīna Garanča is unable to perform in this concert due to illness. Carnegie Hall and The MET Orchestra are immensely grateful to Anna Netrebko for agreeing to appear in her place.

Two second symphonies: Beethoven’s rooted in the Classical era and Schumann’s quintessentially Romantic, frame daring works by strikingly original 20th-century composers. Beethoven’s genial Symphony No. 2 is highly energetic and owes much to the symphonies of Haydn, while Schumann’s Symphony No. 2 features a melancholy third-movement Adagio that has one of the most breathtakingly beautiful melodies ever written.

Listen

Schumann's Symphony No. 2 (Adagio espressivo)


Berliner Philharmoniker | James Levine, Conductor
Deutsche Grammophon

The MET Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Sunday, May 17, 2015 | 3 PM

Performers

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Yefim Bronfman, Piano

Program

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 1
BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique
Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1, one of his first major works for orchestra, is among the grandest concertos. Its stormy opening movement and energetic Rondo finale frame a tender Adagio that Brahms said was a “gentle portrait” of Clara Schumann. Like much of Brahms’s music, it adheres to the models of classical form. But Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique is at the other end of the spectrum. Cast in five movements, each one is an episode in a tale of obsession, madness, and murder that culminates in a terrifying finale that depicts a witches’ sabbath.