Connect with Us

Upcoming Events

No results found.

Top Results

No results found.

  • Carnegie Hall Presents
  • ZH Zankel Hall
  • SA/PS Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • REW Resnick Education Wing
  • WRH Weill Recital Hall
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Ensemble Connect

Monday, October 22, 2018 7:30 PM Weill Recital Hall
URL Copied
Ensemble Connect by Fadi Kheir
The talented young musicians who make up Ensemble Connect have been called “one of the strongest ensembles in the city” by the New York Classical Review. They are fellows in a two-year program that prepares them for careers as daring performers, dedicated teachers, and advocates for music that spans the Baroque to the present day. They display their virtuosity and sense of adventure in a program that features a new work by Gabriella Smith, commissioned by Carnegie Hall, and more.

Performers

Ensemble Connect
·· Leo Sussman, Flute
·· Tamara Winston, Oboe
·· Noémi Sallai, Clarinet
·· Yen-Chen Wu, Bassoon
·· Wilden Dannenberg, French Horn
·· Sae Hashimoto, Percussion
·· Tomer Gewirtzman, Piano
·· Jennifer Liu, Violin
·· Ari Evan, Cello

Program

LIGETI Six Bagatelles for Wind Quintet
GABRIELLA SMITH Anthozoa (NY Premiere, commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
KAIJA SAARIAHO Light and Matter
BRAHMS Clarinet Trio in A Minor, Op. 114

Event Duration

The printed program will last approximately 90 minutes, including one 20-minute intermission.

Salon Encores

Get together with people who love music after this Weill Recital Hall concert for a free drink and discussion with the evening's musicians.
Learn More

Ensemble Connect is a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education.

Lead funding has been provided by the Max H. Gluck Foundation, the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, the Irving Harris Foundation, the Hearst Foundations, The Kovner Foundation, Phyllis and Charles Rosenthal, and The Edmond de Rothschild Foundations.

Additional support has been provided by the Arnow Family Fund, The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, the E.H.A Foundation, Barbara G. Fleischman, Leslie and Tom Maheras, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Susan and Elihu Rose Foundation, Sarah Billinghurst Solomon and Howard Solomon, and the Trust for Mutual Understanding.

Public support is provided by the New York City Department of Education and the New York State Council on the Arts with support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Ensemble Connect is also supported, in part, by an endowment grant from The Kovner Foundation.

Support for the 125 Commissions Project is provided by members of Carnegie Hall’s Composer Club.

At a Glance

LIGETI  Six Bagatelles for Wind Quintet

Hungarian composer György Ligeti was an adventurous explorer of textures, harmonies, and rhythms. Early in his career, he concentrated on distilling his musical language to its essence, as illustrated by these finely wrought miniatures that cover a wide range of textures and expression despite using a purposefully limited number of pitches.

 

GABRIELLA SMITH  Anthozoa

Gabriella Smith combines her passions for music and ecology in this brand-new work for piano trio and percussion. “I get a lot of my inspiration from the forms, structures, and energies in the natural world,” says the young California-born composer, “and I also like math, which can describe these forms, designs, and energies so elegantly.”

 

KAIJA SAARIAHO  Light and Matter

Dating from 2014, Kaija Saariaho’s richly atmospheric piano trio displays her characteristic sensitivity to instrumental colors and timbres. The music was inspired by the changing patterns of light the Finnish composer observed from the window of her New York City apartment overlooking Morningside Park.

 

BRAHMS  Clarinet Trio in A Minor, Op. 114

This warmly lyrical trio for clarinet (or viola), cello, and piano belongs to a cluster of masterworks that Brahms wrote near the end of his life after meeting the distinguished clarinetist Richard Mühlfeld. The composer was so enamored with Mühlfeld’s lithe, silken tone that he affectionately nicknamed him “Fräulein Klarinette.”

Stay Up to Date