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  • Carnegie Hall Presents
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CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

Friday, February 15, 2019 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
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Daniel Harding by Julian Hargreaves, Pierre-Laurent Aimard by Marco Borggreve
Beethoven and Strauss explore the heroic. Beethoven’s titanic spirit is at the core of the “Emperor” Concerto, a grand work where master symphonist and piano virtuoso are joined. Strauss tells the story of a “great man” in his lavishly scored Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life). He never called his piece autobiographical, but there are passages alluding to his earlier music. There is also some of the finest battle music ever written—a show-stopping sequence where the hero clashes with his critics that raised the bar for film composers into the next century and beyond.

Part of: International Festival of Orchestras II

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra is also performing February 14.

Pierre-Laurent Aimard is also performing October 25.

Performers

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Daniel Harding, Conductor
Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Piano

Program

GUILLAUME CONNESSON Eiréné (NY Premiere)
BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 5, "Emperor"
R. STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben

Have you heard?

Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, “Emperor” 

History doesn’t record why Beethoven’s last piano concerto was nicknamed “Emperor,” although an anecdote suggests an audience member at its premiere called it an “emperor of concertos.” It’s certainly the biggest, boldest, and most beloved of his five works in the form. Completed in 1809, Beethoven heralded a new age, anticipating the Romantic era, with a work that’s grandly virtuosic and heroic in spirit—a colossal landmark where master pianist and brilliant symphonist are fused.

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