Connect with Us

Upcoming Events

No results found.

Top Results

No results found.

  • Carnegie Hall Presents
  • ZH Zankel Hall
  • SA/PS Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • REW Resnick Education Wing
  • WRH Weill Recital Hall
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

Sunday, March 3, 2019 2 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
URL Copied
Adam Fischer by Agnete Schlichtekrull, Leonidas Kavakos by Marco Borggreve
Haydn and Mozart are deeply rooted in the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra’s tradition. Hearing them perform works by both composers is a special occasion, but when violin superstar Leonidas Kavakos joins them in Mozart’s elegant and dramatic Violin Concerto No. 5, it’s a concert you cannot miss. Haydn’s Symphony No. 97 thrills from its opening martial trumpets and drum fanfares to its bustling finale. Mozart’s “Jupiter,” his final symphony, opens with great pomp as well, but that’s only an episode in a work of tremendous emotional range that culminates in a miraculous display of counterpoint and joy.

Part of: The Classics: Mozart and Beethoven and International Festival of Orchestras II

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra is also performing March 2March 5, and March 6.

Leonidas Kavakos is also performing October 4 and February 6.

Performers

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Ádám Fischer, Conductor
Leonidas Kavakos, Violin

Program

HAYDN Symphony No. 97
MOZART Violin Concerto No. 5, "Turkish"
MOZART Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter"

Major support for this concert is provided by the Audrey Love Charitable Foundation.

The Vienna Philharmonic Residency at Carnegie Hall is made possible by a leadership gift from the Mercedes T. Bass Charitable Corporation.

Rolex is the Exclusive Partner of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

At a Glance

This program presents three 18th-century masterpieces in the Classical tradition. Two of them—Haydn’s Symphony No. 97 and Mozart’s Symphony No. 41, “Jupiter”—represent the Classical symphony at the peak of perfection. Although these works were written within four years of each other, Haydn (who continued to compose well into old age) was at the height of his popularity and fortune, whereas Mozart (near the end of his short life) was struggling with debt and artistic neglect. Both symphonies are in C major and have a jubilant, festive character, but they also have decidedly somber episodes and a technical subtlety typical of these artists’ late style. Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5, famous for its “Turkish” finale, is an early yet important piece by the composer, full of daring and originality, inaugurating a new kind of violin concerto.

Bios

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

There is perhaps no other musical ensemble more closely associated with the history and tradition of European classical music than the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. In the course of the ...

There is perhaps no other musical ensemble more closely associated with the history and tradition of European classical music than the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. In the course of the past 177 years, the orchestra has experienced and influenced the course of musical history around the world. To this day, prominent soloists and conductors refer to the unique “Viennese sound” as the outstanding quality that sets it apart from other orchestras.

Since its foundation by Otto Nicolai in 1842, the fascination that the orchestra has held for prominent composers and conductors—as well as for audiences all around the world—is based upon the conscious maintenance of a homogenous musical style, which is carefully bequeathed from one generation to the next, as well as a unique history and organizational structure. The pillars of the “Philharmonic idea,” which remain in place today, are a democratic organization that places the entire artistic and organizational decision-making process in the hands of the musicians themselves, and a close symbiosis with the Vienna State Opera Orchestra. From the beginning, the orchestra has displayed a strong social consciousness, characterized by a commitment to individuals in need and the fostering of young musicians.

The orchestra’s touring activity commenced at the beginning of the 20th century and has since taken the orchestra to continents around the globe. In recent years, this has included regularly scheduled concerts in Germany, Japan, the US, and China.

The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performs approximately 40 concerts annually in Vienna, including the New Year’s Concert and the Summer Night Concert Schönbrunn, which are broadcast in numerous countries. The orchestra also has an annual summer residency at the Salzburg Festival and performs more than 50 concerts a year on its international tours. All of these activities underscore the reputation of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra as one of the world’s finest orchestras.

The orchestra has been the recipient of numerous prizes and awards. Since 2008, it has been supported by Rolex, its exclusive sponsor.

Read More
Ádám Fischer

Founder of both the Budapest Wagner Days festival and the Haydn Festival in Eisenstadt, Hungarian-born conductor Ádám Fischer has served as principal conductor of the ...

Founder of both the Budapest Wagner Days festival and the Haydn Festival in Eisenstadt, Hungarian-born conductor Ádám Fischer has served as principal conductor of the Düsseldorfer Symphoniker since 2015 and is artistic consultant of the Tonhalle Düsseldorf. In addition, he is principal conductor of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra and conductor laureate of the Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra, which he founded.

Mr. Fischer has appeared at leading opera houses worldwide, including the Metropolitan Opera; Bayerische Staatsoper; Royal Opera House, Covent Garden; Opéra Bastille; Opernhaus Zürich; and La Scala, where he returns this season for new productions of Ernani and Gianni Schicchi. A guest at the Bayreuth Festival for many years, he was named Conductor of the Year by Opernwelt in 2002 for his performances of Wagner’s Ring cycle. In the concert hall, Mr. Fischer regularly appears with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra; Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment; Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg; Berliner Philharmoniker; Munich Philharmonic; Bamberg Symphony; Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich; Orchestre de Paris; and the Vienna, London, Chicago, Boston, and NHK symphony orchestras.

Born in Budapest, Mr. Fischer studied composition and conducting there and with Hans Swarowsky in Vienna. After serving as Kapellmeister in Helsinki, Karlsruhe, and at the Bayerische Staatsoper in Munich, he served as general music director in Freiburg (1981–1983), Kassel (1987–1992), and Mannheim (2000–2005) before becoming artistic director of the Hungarian State Opera (2007–2010). He received ECHO Klassik awards for his recordings of the complete symphonies of Haydn with the Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra, an International Classical Music Award in 2015 for a recording of the complete Mozart symphonies with the Danish National Chamber Orchestra, and Grand Prix du Disque awards for his recordings of Goldmark’s The Queen of Sheba and Bartók’s Bluebeard’s Castle.

Mr. Fischer is an honorary member of the Vienna State Opera and the Musikverein für Steiermark in Graz. He is a recipient of the Order of the Dannebrog, awarded by the Queen of Denmark; was given the honorary title of professor by the Austrian Federal President; and was awarded Israel’s Wolf Prize in 2018. Visit adamfischer.at for more information.

Read More
Leonidas Kavakos

Leonidas Kavakos is recognized as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known for the integrity of his playing and for his virtuosity and superb musicianship. By age 21, Mr. Kavakos had ...

Leonidas Kavakos is recognized as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known for the integrity of his playing and for his virtuosity and superb musicianship. By age 21, Mr. Kavakos had won three major competitions: the International Jean Sibelius Violin Competition (1985), the Paganini Competition (1988), and the Naumburg International Piano Competition (1988). This success led to his recording the original Sibelius Violin Concerto (1903–1904), the first recording of the work in history, which won the Gramophone Concerto of the Year Award in 1991. Mr. Kavakos was awarded the Gramophone Artist of the Year Award in 2014, and was the winner of Denmark’s Léonie Sonning Music Prize in 2017.

During the 2018–2019 season, Mr. Kavakos is an artist-in-residence at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. In North America, he performs with the San Francisco Symphony, and is joined by pianist Enrico Pace on a US recital tour to Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Seattle, Fort Worth, and Philadelphia. Highlights in Europe include a tour with Emanuel Ax and Yo-Yo Ma in performances of Brahms’s trios, and appearances as soloist with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, and Danish National Symphony Orchestra, among others. In addition, Mr. Kavakos tours to China, giving both recital and orchestral performances. He also has built a strong profile as a conductor, leading the Vienna Symphony, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Chamber Orchestra of Europe, and Budapest Festival Orchestra this season.

Mr. Kavakos recently signed an exclusive contract with Sony Classical, for whom he has previously recorded Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto and Mozart’s violin concertos, play-conducting with Camerata Salzburg. In the fall of 2017, Mr. Kavakos joined Mr. Ma and Mr. Ax for a highly successful recording of Brahms’s trios for the label. Upcoming recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, which he will play-conduct with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, followed by Bach’s complete solo sonatas and partitas. Mr. Kavakos’s recordings on the Decca label include Virtuoso; Brahms’s violin sonatas with Yuja Wang; Brahms’s Violin Concerto with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and Riccardo Chailly; and the complete Beethoven violin sonatas with Mr. Pace. Mr. Kavakos plays the “Willemotte” Stradivarius violin of 1734.

Read More

Stay Up to Date