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CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Itzhak Perlman, Violin
Evgeny Kissin, Piano

Thursday, April 25, 2019 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
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Itzhak Perlman by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco / Sony Music Entertainment, Evgeny Kissin by Sasha Gusov
There are superstar duos and then there are the megastar duos that you see at Carnegie Hall, like the team of violinist Itzhak Perlman and pianist Evgeny Kissin. In a rare joint appearance, these legendary virtuosi show off their tremendous musicianship in an evening of unforgettable music-making.

Part of: Great Artists II

Pick four concerts and save now.

Please note that if you purchase stage seating, please arrive one hour before concert time.

Evgeny Kissin is also performing April 15 and May 16.

Performers

Itzhak Perlman, Violin
Evgeny Kissin, Piano

Program

MOZART Violin Sonata in D Major, K. 306

BRAHMS Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 100

BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 9 in A Major, Op. 47, "Kreutzer"


Encores:

TCHAIKOVSKY "Kuda, kuda vï udalilis" (Lensky's Aria) from Act II of Eugene Onegin (arr. Leopold Auer)

DE FALLA "Danse Espagnole" from La vida breve (arr. Fritz Kreisler)

Event Duration

The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.
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At a Glance

MOZART  Violin Sonata in D Major, K. 306

Over the course of his career, Mozart wrote 32 duo sonatas for violin and keyboard. Most of the “juvenile” sonatas were designed to showcase his precocious virtuosity on the piano and cast the violin in a subordinate role. In contrast, the Sonata in D Major, K. 306—one of five sonatas dating from the composer’s tenure as a court musician in the service of Archbishop Colloredo in Salzburg—exemplify his increasingly evenhanded treatment of the two instruments.

 

BRAHMS  Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 100

Composed between 1879 and 1888, Brahms’s three sonatas for violin and piano are works of mature and unostentatious mastery. In contrast with the Violin Concerto of 1878, the sonatas are predominantly intimate and conversational in tone. The warmth and intimacy of the A-Major Sonata reflect the composer’s close friendship and artistic collaboration with violinist Joseph Joachim.

 

BEETHOVEN  Violin Sonata No. 9 in A Major, Op. 47, “Kreutzer”

The bravura “Kreutzer” is the last of nine sonatas for violin and piano that Beethoven composed between 1797 and 1803. (Another nine years would elapse before he wrote his 10th and final violin sonata.) By rights, it should be called the “Bridgetower” Sonata, since Beethoven wrote it for the celebrated English violinist George Bridgetower. After the two men had a falling out, however, the composer switched the dedication to French virtuoso Rodolphe Kreutzer—who, ironically, never played it in public.

Bios

Itzhak Perlman

A reigning virtuoso of the violin, Itzhak Perlman enjoys superstar status rarely afforded a classical musician. Beloved for his charm and humanity as well as for his talent, he is treasured  ...

A reigning virtuoso of the violin, Itzhak Perlman enjoys superstar status rarely afforded a classical musician. Beloved for his charm and humanity as well as for his talent, he is treasured by audiences around the world for his remarkable artistry and irrepressible joy for making music.

Mr. Perlman has performed with every major orchestra and at concert halls around the world. He was granted a Presidential Medal of Freedom—the highest civilian honor in the United States—by President Barack Obama in 2015; a Kennedy Center Honor in 2003; a National Medal of Arts by President Bill Clinton in 2000; and a Medal of Liberty by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. He has been honored with 16 Grammy Awards, four Emmy Awards, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and a Genesis Prize.

The 2018–2019 season marks the 60th anniversary of Mr. Perlman’s US debut and appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on November 2, 1958. This milestone was celebrated with a return to the Ed Sullivan Theater in November 2018 in a special guest appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Mr. Perlman also performed Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto with Gustavo Dudamel at the Hollywood Bowl, and made season-opening gala appearances with the San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas, and with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and Krzysztof Urbański.

This spring, Mr. Perlman performs duo concerts for the first time with celebrated pianist Evgeny Kissin in Boston, Chicago, New York, and Washington, DC. He has also made appearances with longtime collaborator Rohan De Silva throughout the season in recitals across North America. Mr. Perlman debuts a new program next month entitled Evening with Itzhak Perlman, which captures highlights of his career through narrative and multimedia elements intertwined with performance.

In addition to his engagements as violinist and conductor, Mr. Perlman also makes an increasing number of appearances as a speaker. In November 2018, he joined Alan Alda for a conversation at 92nd Street Y. An award-winning documentary about Mr. Perlman, Itzhak, premiered in October 2017 as the opening film at the Hamptons International Film Festival. The film was released theatrically in more than 100 cinemas nationwide in March 2018, with international releases following in the summer of 2018. Directed by filmmaker Alison Chernick, the documentary details the virtuoso’s struggles as a polio survivor and Jewish émigré, and serves as a reminder of art’s vitality. For more information, visit itzhakthefilm.com.

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Evgeny Kissin

Evgeny Kissin’s musicality, the depth and poetic quality of his interpretations, and his extraordinary virtuosity have earned him the veneration and admiration deserved only by one of  ...

Evgeny Kissin’s musicality, the depth and poetic quality of his interpretations, and his extraordinary virtuosity have earned him the veneration and admiration deserved only by one of the most gifted classical pianists of his generation and, arguably, generations past. He is in demand the world over, and has appeared with many great orchestras and conductors, including Claudio Abbado, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Daniel Barenboim, Christoph von Dohnányi, Carlo Maria Giulini, James Levine, Lorin Maazel, Riccardo Muti, and Seiji Ozawa.

Mr. Kissin was born in Moscow in October 1971 and began to play piano by ear at the age of two. At six years old, he entered a special school for gifted children, Moscow’s Gnessin School of Music, where he was a student of Anna Pavlovna Kantor, who has been his only teacher. At the age of 10, Mr. Kissin made his concerto debut playing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K. 466, and gave his first solo recital in Moscow one year later. He came to international attention in March 1984 when, at the age of 12, he performed Chopin’s First and Second piano concertos in the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory with the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Dmitri Kitayenko. This concert was recorded live by Melodiya, and a two-LP album was released the following year. Given the astounding success of this recording, Melodiya released five more LPs of Mr. Kissin’s live performances in Moscow.

During the 2018–2019 season, Mr. Kissin has given solo recitals in Vancouver and San Francisco before embarking on an extensive tour of Asia that included recitals in Taipei, Hong Kong, Seoul, Yokohama, Tokyo, and Osaka, as well as a tour of Japan with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and an appearance with the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. In Europe, he performs with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, and Berliner Philharmoniker, among others. In addition to touring major European and North American cities with a solo recital program of Chopin, Schumann, Debussy, and Scriabin, Mr. Kissin partners with Itzhak Perlman for duo recitals in Boston, Chicago, New York, and Washington, DC.

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