Connect with Us

Upcoming Events

No results found.

Top Results

No results found.

CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Christian Tetzlaff, Violin
Tanja Tetzlaff, Cello
Lars Vogt, Piano

Friday, May 3, 2019 7:30 PM Zankel Hall
URL Copied
Christian Tetzlaff, Tanja Tetzlaff, and Lars Vogt
The trios of Schumann and Dvořák are connected by their emotional breadth and ambitious dimensions. The Schumann trio’s heroic opening sets the tone for unbridled passion, energetic virtuosity, and (in the third movement) breathtaking tenderness. Dvořák’s trio has turbulent emotion and a depth of expression that is highly personal—he was mourning the loss of his mother—while also glowing with beautiful melodies, particularly in its heartfelt slow movement. The finale is quintessential Dvořák, with the joyful folk-infused melodies for which he is well known.

Part of: Chamber Sessions I

Performers

Christian Tetzlaff, Violin
Tanja Tetzlaff, Cello
Lars Vogt, Piano

Program

SCHUMANN Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor

DVOŘÁK Piano Trio in F Minor

This concert is made possible, in part, by The Joan and Ernest Bragin Endowment Fund.

At a Glance

SCHUMANN  Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 63

Although Schumann composed four symphonies, several concertos, and even an opera, his impulsive genius found its most characteristic expression in art songs and piano pieces, including a small body of chamber music for keyboard and strings. Of his three piano trios, Op. 63 in D minor has long been an audience favorite, despite what Schumann himself described as its “gloomy” character. The work illustrates the “completely new manner of composing” that he explored in the 1840s.

 

DVOŘÁK  Piano Trio in F Minor, Op. 65

As Dvořák strode onto the world stage in the late 1870s and early 1880s, his performing career booming and his works championed by a prominent German publisher, he set out to overcome his reputation as a musical nationalist in the mold of Smetana and cultivate a more sophisticated, cosmopolitan profile. In this brooding but richly lyrical masterpiece, he reasserts his identity as a Czech composer even as he embraces an international musical language.

Stay Up to Date