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CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Cancelled: Mitsuko Uchida, Piano

Tuesday, April 7, 2020 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
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Mitsuko Uchida by Geoffroy Schied
One facet of Beethoven’s genius was his gift for taking something slight and building it into an epic masterpiece. Such is the case with the little waltz theme by Diabelli upon which Beethoven constructed a colossal set of variations that journey from the comic to the profound.

Part of: Keyboard Virtuosos I and Beethoven Celebration

There is a limit of 8 tickets per household. Additional orders exceeding the ticket limit may be cancelled without notice. This includes orders associated with the same name, email address, billing address, credit card number and/or other information.

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Mitsuko Uchida is also performing March 28.

Performers

Mitsuko Uchida, Piano

Program

BEETHOVEN Thirty-Three Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli, Op. 120

This concert is generously underwritten by Olivier and Desiree Berggruen.

Lead support for the Beethoven Celebration is provided by The Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund.

National Endowment for the Arts: arts.gov

Public support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

In honor of the centenary of his birth, Carnegie Hall’s 2019–2020 season is dedicated to the memory of Isaac Stern in recognition of his extraordinary contributions to Carnegie Hall, arts advocacy, and the field of music.

At a Glance

In 1823, Anton Diabelli wrote a 32-bar waltz in C major and commissioned variations from a “Who’s Who” of Austrian composers. Among those who contributed to this patriotic anthology were Schubert, Hummel, Czerny, and Moscheles. Beethoven, as usual, went his own way, composing a set of dazzlingly inventive variations on Diabelli’s tune that is one of the pinnacles of the piano repertory. Musicologist Lewis Lockwood speculates that Beethoven was one-upping himself, having written a set of 32 variations on an original theme as a young man. Another likely source of inspiration was Bach’s monumental Goldberg Variations, which (like the Diabelli Variations) run the gamut of moods between brilliance and introspection, lyrical simplicity and contrapuntal virtuosity.

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