• Wednesday, Dec 7, 2016

    Carnegie Hall Presents La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic

    Citywide Festival Devoted to Culture of the Venetian Republic, the Independent City-state that Flourished for a Thousand Years
    February 3–21, 2017
    Early music performed at Carnegie Hall by many leading artists, including Jordi Savall & Hespèrion XXI, Venice Baroque Orchestra, Concerto Italiano, and many more
    Festival events at prestigious partner organizations throughout New York City includemusic, theater, visual arts, lectures, and panel discussions

    (December 7, 2016; NEW YORK, NY)—From February 3–21, 2017, Carnegie Hall leads a citywide festival, La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic, saluting the stunning artistic legacy of the Venetian Republic, the independent, forward-thinking, and influential city-state that stood distinctly apart from Italy and the rest of Europe for a thousand years until 1797 when it was dismantled by Napoleon. The La Serenissima festival, which falls during the period of Venice’s fabled Carnevale, will feature more than a dozen Carnegie Hall concerts of vocal masterpieces and virtuoso instrumental music from the time period as well as a wide array of partner events at leading cultural institutions across New York City spanning a multitude of artistic genres.

    Festival highlights at Carnegie Hall include The Millenarian Venice: Gateway to the East, a survey of more than 1,000 years of music from Venice, Istanbul, Cyprus, and Crete with Jordi Savall and his ensembles Hespèrion XXI, soloists of La Capella Reial de Catalunya, and Le Concert des Nations; Vivaldi’s dramatic oratorio Juditha triumphans with the Venice Baroque Orchestra; and Monteverdi’s monumental final opera, L’incoronazione di Poppea, performed by Concerto Italiano led by Rinaldo Alessandrini. Also featured is chamber music performed by Quicksilver; the New York–based TENET, presenting The Secret Lover: Women in 17th-Century Italy; chamber orchestra Il Pomo d’Oro; and The Tallis Scholars, who lead a workshop for young singers that culminates in a joint concert, performing polychoral repertoire written expressly for Venice’s St. Mark’s Basilica.

    The La Serenissima festival celebration extends citywide with a wide array of events presented by leading cultural partners such as Columbia University’s Department of Italian and The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America; Company XIV; The Frick Collection; The Jewish Museum; The Juilliard School; Italian Cultural Institute; The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Morgan Library & Museum; New York Public Library; New York University/Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò; the Centro Primo Levi Center; Save Venice, Inc.; The Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center; and St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue. Festival offerings will include paneldiscussions, theatrical events, and art exhibitions that not only examine the rich culture of theVenetian Republic but also the scandalous, ribald, and libertine history that the passage of time has renderedless familiar. The festival also offers a number of digital exhibitions launching this February with online partners to include Ca’ Rezzonico, Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia, Corning Museum of Glass, and Renato Maestro Library and Archive.

    "Anyone who has traveled to Venice knows that there is nowhere like it in the world. As beautiful as it is today, it is also a reflection of a bygone era, a remarkable product of its historic geographic connection between East and West, shaped by the many cultural, social, and political influences that have moved through the city over the centuries,” said Clive Gillinson, Carnegie Hall’s Executive and Artistic Director. “For this season’s Carnegie Hall festival, we set out to explore the dazzling thousand-year marvel that was The Venetian Republic, a rich and creative period in history that offers incredible opportunities for musical and artistic discoveries for our audiences of today. Concertgoers will have the chance to immerse themselves in music of this time, discovering masterworks and rarely-heard gems, performed by leading artists who have championed this music throughout their careers. The fascinating programming created by our partner institutions across the city extends a further invitation into this vibrant world, providing even greater cultural context and insights.”

    LA SERENISSIMA FESTIVAL PROGRAMMING AT CARNEGIE HALL

    Jordi Savall
    and his early music ensembles Hespèrion XXI, soloists of La Capella Reial de Catalunya, and Le Concert des Nations launch the festival on February 3 in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with special guest artists in a program entitled The Millenarian Venice: Gateway to the East, an intriguing musical tour through the 1,000-year history of the Venetian Republic and its far-flung territories. The program will feature music ranging from the Medieval to the Baroque from around the Mediterranean rim, extending through to Persia, the eras of the Byzantine and Ottoman empires, and of course to Venice itself, home to groundbreaking composers like Willaert, Monteverdi, and Vivaldi, among others. Savall returns with Hespèrion XXI for a second festival program on February 12 in Zankel Hall, performing Italian instrumental music from the 16th and 17th centuries in a program entitled Musica Nova: Venetian Influences in Musical Europe.

    Music Director Andrea Marcon leads the Venice Baroque Orchestra on February 7 in a rare performance in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage of Vivaldi’s oratorio Juditha triumphans with contralto Delphine Galou singing the title role alongside Mary-Ellen Nesi (Holofernes), Ann Hallenberg (Vagaus), Francesca Ascioti (Ozias), Silke Gäng (Abra), and TENET. The score includes instruments like the chalumeau (an ancestor of the modern clarinet), theorbos (huge lutes), a consort of viole all’inglese, as well as recorders viole d’amore, and more.

    Conductor and harpsichordist Rinaldo Alessandrini leads Concerto Italiano on February 21 in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, in a concert performance of Monteverdi’s masterpiece L’incoronazione di Poppea, an opera on the grand scale that tells a tale of ancient Roman political machinations, adultery, and murder. This stunningly expressive music features soprano Miah Persson (Poppea), tenor Leonardo Cortellazzi (Nerone), soprano Roberta Invernizzi (Ottavia), and contralto Sara Mingardo (Ottone).

    Other musical offerings at Carnegie Hall during the festival include Quicksilver, led by violinists and directors Robert Mealy and Julie Andrijeski, in a program entitled Sonatas from La Serenissima with instrumental works by Castello, Marini, Lengrenzi, Vivaldi, and more on February 9 in Weill Recital Hall. The concert features Dominic Teresi (dulcian), David Morris (viola da gamba), Avi Stein (harpsichord), and Charles Weaver (theorbo). British vocal ensemble Gallicantus performs a program in Weill Recital Hall on February 11 entitled Death in Venice: The Venetian Lamentand its English Imitators, exploring the evolution of the Venetian School from Willaert to masterpieces by Monteverdi, as well as its influence on English and Flemish composers of the time. Period ensemble Il Pomo d’Oro performs two concerts: first with conductor and violinist Dmitry Sinkovsky leading a performance of Vivaldi concertos alongside works of Brescianello and Galuppi in Weill Recital Hall on February 13; and Maxim Emelyanychev conducting a program of arias and love duets from 17th- and 18th-century Venetian operas with soprano Emöke Baráth and mezzo-soprano Giuseppina Bridelli on February 14 in Zankel Hall. In Weill Recital Hall on February 17, New York–based early-music ensemble TENET is featured in a program entitled The Secret Lover: Women in 17th-Century Italy including three cantatas and a trio for female voices by Barbara Strozzi, madrigals by Monteverdi, and instrumental works by Merula and Kapsberger. The Ahmet Erdoğdular Classical Turkish Music Ensemble, featuring one of Turkey’s foremost vocalists, representing the significant Byzantine and Ottoman influence in the development of the Venetian Republic,performs in Zankel Hall on February 17. Artistic Director Leonardo Garcia Alarcón leads Cappella Mediterranea in an all-Monteverdi program entitled Angeli e Demoni on February 18 in Zankel Hall, and on February 20 in Weill Recital Hall Ensemble Connect offers a program to include music by Vivaldi and Marcello in addition to the New York premiere of a new work by Caroline Shaw commissioned by Carnegie Hall and featuring the composer as guest performer.


    LA SERENISSIMA
    FESTIVAL PROGRAMMING BY GENRE
    (presented by Carnegie Hall unless otherwise noted) 


    PERFORMANCES


    Jordi Savall and Hespèrion XXI
    Thursday, February 3 at 7:30 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall

    Sunday, February 12 at 3:00 PM
    Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Jordi Savall and his early music ensembles Hespèrion XXI, soloists of La Capella Reial de Catalunya, and Le Concert des Nations, along with performers on traditional instruments from around the Mediterranean and Asia Minor, launch the festival at Carnegie Hall with a wide-ranging program entitled The Millenarian Venice: Gateway to the East which includes ancient Byzantine hymns, Ottoman and Persian dances, psalms, madrigals, and the music of Monteverdi, Willaert, Vivaldi, and Mozart. Savall returns with Hespèrion XXI, performing Italian instrumental music from the 16th and 17th centuries in a program entitled Musica Nova: Venetian Influences in Musical Europe.
    _______

    Daniel Hyde, Organ
    Saturday, February 4 at 2 PM
    Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue
    1 West 53rd Street ǀ Manhattan
    saintthomaschurch.org/music

    Daniel Hyde—Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue’s new organist and director of music—explores the hugely influential Venetian style, with works ranging from luminaries such as Giovanni Gabrieli—the organist of Venice’s venerable St. Mark’s Basilica for nearly three decades—Merula, and Vivaldi (as arranged by Bach and Walther), to 20th-century homages by Ligeti and Tippett. This performance is free.

    Presented by Concerts at Saint Thomas.
    _______

    Venice Baroque Orchestra
    Tuesday, February 7 at 7 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall

    Music Director Andrea Marcon leads the Venice Baroque Orchestra in Vivaldi’s gripping and sole-surviving oratorio Juditha triumphans with contralto Delphine Galou singing the title role, Mary-Ellen Nesi (Holofernes), Ann Hallenberg (Vagaus), Francesca Ascioti (Ozias), Silke Gäng (Abra), and TENET.
    _______

    Venetian Voices: The Splendors of San Marco
    Wednesday, February 8 at 8 PM
    Church of St. Ignatius Loyola
    980 Park Avenue | Manhattan
    carnegiehall.org/tallis

    Peter Phillips and The Tallis Scholars train and perform alongside young choral singers in a multi-day workshop that culminates in this joint concert, featuring signature polychoral repertoire written expressly for St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice by Willaert and Giovanni Gabrieli, as well as works by composers from elsewhere in Renaissance and Baroque Europe who were influenced by the Venetian style, such as Palestrina and Victoria.
    _______

    The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice
    Wednesday, February 8 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 11 at 8 PM
    Sunday, February 12 at 2 PM
    Thursday, February 16 at 7:30 PM
    Sunday, February 19 at 8 PM 
    The Juilliard School | McClelland Drama Theater
    155 West 65th Street, Fourth Floor | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu

    Originally set in late 16th-century Venice and Cyprus, Shakespeare’s epic tragedy of prejudice, mistrust, and betrayal still resonates strongly today. With a scaled-down cast of seven actors, Jonathan Rosenberg examines the corrosive effect of social forces on the most intimate of human and family relationships.

    Presented by Juilliard Drama.
    _______

    Quicksilver
    Thursday, February 9 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Quicksilver, led by violinists Robert Mealy and Julie Andrijeski, plays Sonatas from La Serenissima, including works from the 17th and 18th centuries by Castello, Marini, Lengrenzi, Vivaldi, and more.
    _______

    Memoirs
    Thursday, February 9 at 6:30 PM
    Kairos Italy Theater
    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street ǀ Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org

    Pioneering 18th-century Venetian playwright and librettist Carlo Goldoni reinvigorated the commedia dell’arte tradition, injecting his comedies with realism, tighter plots, a new spontaneity, and middle-class characters. Kairos Italy Theater gives the US premiere of a staged version of his Memoirs—performed only once before under the direction of the legendary Giorgio Strehler. This performance is free.

    Presented by Kairos Italy Theater in collaboration with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.
    _______

    The Serpent Woman
    Friday, February 10 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 11 at 2 PM
    Wednesday, February 15 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 18 at 8 PM
    Sunday, February 19 at 2 PM
    The Juilliard School | McClelland Drama Theater
    155 West 65th Street, Fourth Floor | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu

    Venetian writer and satirist Carlo Gozzi—a proponent of commedia dell’arte when the form was in decline—wrote this tragicomic fairy tale in 1762. Ribald, fanciful, funny, dark, and picaresque, this play recounts the tribulations of a mortal king in love with a fairy, set in a phantasmagoric world of demons and mythic beasts.

    Presented by Juilliard Drama.
    _______

    Handel’s Agrippina
    Juilliard Opera
    Juilliard415

    February 11, 18, 20, and 22.

    Composed for Carnival in 1709, Handel’s path-breaking opera Agrippina marked the 24-year-old composer’s first operatic masterpiece, establishing his international reputation and setting the course for future triumphs. Juilliard Opera offers one concert performance at Alice Tully Halland three staged performancesin the black-box setting of the Willson Theater.

    Conducted by Laurence Cummings
    Saturday, February 11 at 7:30 PM
    Alice Tully Hall
    1941 Broadway ǀ Manhattan

    Conducted by Jeffery Grossman
    Saturday, February 18 at 2 PM
    Monday, February 20 at 7:30 PM
    Wednesday, February 22 at 7:30 PM
    Willson Theater
    155 West 65th Street ǀ Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu

    Presented by The Juilliard School.
    _______

    Gallicantus
    Saturday, February 11 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Renaissance vocal ensemble Gallicantus performs Death in Venice: The Venetian Lament and its English Imitators, a program illustrating the evolution of the Venetian school from works by Flemish composers Willaert, Vautor, Arcadelt, and Rore to two masterpieces by Monteverdi and on to English works written by Byrd, Tomkins, Tallis, and Coprario under the Venetian influence.
    _______

    The Worth of Women: Wherein is Clearly Revealed Their Nobility and Superiority to Men
    Saturday, February 11 at 3 PM
    Kairos Italy Theater
    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street ǀ Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org

    Kairos Italy Theater gives the US premiere of The Worth of Women by Venetian writer and poet Moderata Fonte, a 16th-century advocate of gender equality. Radical and witty, this work depicts conversations among seven diverse Venetian noblewomen, exploring women’s roles in public and private, femininity and ambition, men’s hostility, and possible remedies. This performance is free.

    Presented by Kairos Italy Theater in collaboration with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.
    _______

    Carnevale Commedia Ball
    Saturday, February 11 at 8 PM
    The Grand Prospect Hall
    263 Prospect Avenue ǀ Brooklyn
    companyxiv.com
    dancesofvice.com

    Carnevale di Venezia comes to life in a sumptuous, over-the-top fusion of Baroque dance, live music, opera, circus, gender-bending burlesque, and vivid immersive theater with New York fantasy architects Company XIV and Dances of Vice. This one-night Carnival of Venice–themed extravaganza unfolds in the palatial ballroom of Brooklyn’s landmark Grand Prospect Hall.

    Presented by Company XIV and Dances of Vice in collaboration with The Grand Prospect Hall.
    _______

    Il Pomo d’Oro
    Monday, February 13 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall
     
    Tuesday, February 14 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Il Pomo d’Oro performs two concerts, first with conductor and violinist Dmitry Sinkovsky leading a performance of Vivaldi concertos alongside works of Brescianello and Galuppi and Maxim Emelyanychev conducting a program of arias and love duets from 17th- and 18th-century Venetian operas with soprano Emöke Baráth and mezzo-soprano Giuseppina Bridelli.
    _______

    From Ghetto to Cappella: Interfaith Exchanges in the Music of Baroque Italy
    Thursday, February 16 at 8 PM
    The Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center
    1 East 65th Street ǀ Manhattan
    salonsanctuary.org

    The early-music series Salon/Sanctuary Concerts offers a program of unaccompanied Hebrew chants and music of Barbara Strozzi, S. Rossi, and B. Marcello, among others, illustrating a vibrant dialogue during a time of great oppression—a cross-fertilization of musical ideas and cultures between Venice’s Jews and Catholics that traversed the forbidding walls of the city’s Jewish ghetto.

    Presented by The Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center in partnership with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.
    _______

    TENET
    Friday, February 17 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall

    New York-based early music ensemble TENET performs a program entitled The Secret Lover: Women in 17th-Century Italy that includes cantatas and a trio for female voices by Strozzi; duos and trios by Monteverdi; songs by Merula and others; and instrumental works by Kapsberger.
    _______

    The Ahmet Erdoğdular Classical Turkish Music Ensemble
    Friday, February 17 at 8:30 PM
    Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Ahmet Erdoğdular, one of Turkey’s foremost vocalists, is dedicated to preserving and promoting the classical vocal traditions from the Byzantine and Ottoman empires that many Europeans would have first heard in Venice centuries ago. His repertoire includes classical vocal music, ghazals (sung poetry), and Sufi music, particularly that of the Mevlevi (Whirling Dervishes). Erdoğdular is joined by musicians on ney, oud (lute), kanun (zither), and kemenche (spike fiddle).
     _______

    Capella Mediterranea
    Saturday, February 18 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Artistic Director Leonardo García Alarcón brings Cappella Mediterranea to perform in an all-Monteverdi program Angeli e Demoni, built around the seven heavenly virtues and seven deadly sins.
     _______

    Ensemble Connect
    Monday, February 20 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall

    Ensemble Connectperforms the New York premiere of a new work by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Caroline Shaw, commissioned by Carnegie Hall. The program also features the vibrant music of Monteverdi (arr. Berio), Vivaldi, A. Marcello, and more.  
    _______

    Concerto Italiano
    Tuesday, February 21 at 7:00 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall

    Harpsichordist and conductor Rinaldo Alessandrini leads Concerto Italiano in a concert performance of Monteverdi’s L'incoronazione di Poppea  featuring soprano Miah Persson (Poppea), tenor Leonardo Cortellazzi (Nerone), soprano Roberta Invernizzi (Ottavia), and contralto Sara Mingardo (Ottone).
    _______


    TALKS

    The Millenarian Venice
    Thursday, February 2 at 5:30 PM
    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
    1161 Amsterdam Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    italianacademy.columbia.edu/events

    On the eve of the opening concert of La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic—in which he, his ensembles, and other guest artists are featured—early-music legend and forensic musicologist Jordi Savall discusses the myriad musical styles and influences at play throughout the 1,000-year lifespan of the Venetian Republic. This event is free.

    Presented by The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University.
    _______

    Music in Situ: Venetian Music in its Artistic Context 
    Monday, February 6 at 6:30 PM
    The Morgan Library & Museum
    225 Madison Avenue | Manhattan
    themorgan.org/programs

    Featuring commentary, slides, and live musical selections, this multimedia experience highlights the architectural monuments in which musical works of the late-Renaissance and early modern periods were performed, the paintings and frescoes also housed therein, and a sampling of extraordinary music that marked the last centuries of the Venetian Republic.

    Co-presented by The Morgan Library & Museum and Save Venice Inc.
    _______

    Celebrating La Serenissima
    February 9 and 16
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    1000 Fifth Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    metmuseum.org/events/programs
    ;

           Thursday, February 9 at 11 AM
           “The Brothell House of Europe”: Venice on the Grand Tour
           with Kevin Salatino

           Thursday, February 16 at 11 AM
           Venice in the Age of Jacopo Tintoretto
           with Andrea Bayer

    Taking a critical look at the culture and society of the Venetian Republic, the first lecture offers a window onto the city’s fabled association with eroticism and sexual license that shaped the experiences of 18th-century Grand Tourists in Venice. The second focuses on the Renaissance master Tintoretto’s bold and dramatic paintings, and the extraordinary characters who peopled his world.

    Presented by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    _______

    Sirens of La Serenissima: Creative Women and Feminist Forerunners in Early Modern Venice
    Friday, February 10 at 6:30 PM
    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street ǀ Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org

    This roundtable discussion on the remarkable tradition of early modern Venetian women’s writing features readings from works penned by courtesan Veronica Franco; dissident Baroque nun Arcangela Tarabotti; outspoken Jewish author, poet, and intellectual Sara Copia Sullam; and proto-feminist theorist Moderata Fonte. This event is free.

    Presented by New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.
    _______

    East of Venice: La Serenissima as Seen from its Eastern Frontiers
    Monday, February 13 at 5:30 PM
    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
    1161 Amsterdam Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    italianacademy.columbia.edu/events

    Viewing the history of the Venetian Republic through the lens of its neighbors in the Balkans and its Mediterranean frontiers, this international panel of specialists examines the various exchanges—cultural, linguistic, religious, among others—between the Ottoman and the Venetian worlds, East and West. This event is free.

    Co-presented by Columbia University’s Department of Italian, its Italian and Mediterranean Colloquium, and The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America.
    _______

    The Painter and the Libertine: Titian and Pietro Aretino

    Wednesday, February 15 at 6 PM
    The Frick Collection
    1 East 70th Street ǀ Manhattan
    frick.org

    Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator of The Frick Collection, discusses one of the museum’s most important Venetian paintings: Titian’s portrait of his friend Pietro Aretino—a well-connected author, playwright, satirist, blackmailer, and libertine.

    Presented by The Frick Collection.
    _______

    Venetian Paintings in The Frick Collection
    Thursday, February 16 at 6 PM
    The Frick Collection
    1 East 70th Street ǀ Manhattan
    frick.org

    Between 1905 and 1918, Henry Clay Frick acquired a small but superb collection of paintings by Bellini, Titian, Veronese, and Tiepolo. In this seminar, these exceptional works are given a closer look, with a focus on the artists who created them and their influence on one another.

    Presented by The Frick Collection.
    _______

    The Golden Age of the Venetian Republic
    Thursday, February 16 at 6 PM
    Italian Cultural Institute
    686 Park Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    iicnewyork.esteri.it

    In talks that explore La Serenissima’s social, cultural, and political history, bestselling Italian historian and novelist Alessandro Barbero views Venice’s relationship with the Ottoman Empire through the lens of the epic Battle of Lepanto in 1571, while Edward Muir Jr. examines the remarkably free exchange of ideas that flourished in Venice—some of them incendiary. This event is free; online reservations are recommended.

    Presented by the Italian Cultural Institute.
    _______

    The Ghetto, Venice, and the Jews: A Historical Journey
    Sunday, February 19 at 2 PM
    The Jewish Museum
    1109 Fifth Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    thejewishmuseum.org/programs

    Founded in 1516, Venice’s Jewish ghetto marked the first instance of urban segregation in Western history and has since emerged as a universal metaphor of oppression and resilience. This roundtable of prominent scholars of early modern Europe invites the public to look at La Serenissima through the eyes of its Jewish minority, and to imagine a time when the concepts of nation-state, citizenship, rights, and identity were yet unformed.

    Presented by the Centro Primo Levi in partnership with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò and The Jewish Museum.

    _______

    EXHIBITS

    Memories of La Serenissima; Nineteenth-Century Artists in Venice
    February 2 to March 2
    Italian Cultural Institute
    686 Park Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    iicnewyork.esteri.it

    This exhibit, curated by Marco Bertoli, presents a selection of paintings by artists born not long after the fall of the Venetian Republic who paid it vivid tribute, revealing how the memory of La Serenissima and the ties to its wondrous artistic canon endured throughout the century that followed its demise. This exhibit is free.

    Presented by the Italian Cultural Institute.
    _______

    Love in Venice
    February 10 to August 31
    New York Public Library
    476 Fifth Avenue ǀ Manhattan
    nypl.org

    This exhibition examines the literary, artistic, musical, and cultural aspects of Venice’s seductiveness, including its beautiful courtesans, lavish festivals, lively carnivals, and libertine counterculture through diverse works that range from etchings by Tiepolo and a letter from Lord Byron recounting his amorous conquests, to wedding poetry and pop-up books that reveal the undergarments of Venetian prostitutes. This exhibit is free.

    Presented by the New York Public Library.

    _______

    DIGITAL EXHIBITS

    Ca’ Rezzonico: A Journey into 18th-Century Venice

    Ca’ Rezzonico—a dazzling palazzo and museum on the Grand Canal dedicated to 18th-century Venice—houses period furnishings, a resplendent ballroom, sculptures, frescoes, and masterful paintings by Longhi, Guardi, Tiepolo, Canaletto, and Tintoretto. This special digital exhibition offers a guided tour of some of the museum’s most treasured art and objects.

    Presented by Ca’ Rezzonico and the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia in collaboration with Google Cultural Institute.

    google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/u/0/exhibit/YwIi0eNKwSb5Kg?hl=en
    _______

    The Art and Technique of Renaissance Venetian Glasswork

    This digital showcase of Venetian luxury-glass objects from 1500 to 1720—a golden age unparalleled in the 3,500-year history of glassmaking—includes demonstrations of Renaissance Venetian glassmaking techniques and a blog by William Gudenrath, resident advisor of The Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass.

    Presented by the Corning Museum of Glass.

    renvenetian.cmog.org
    _______

    Venetian Music and Glass: Two Simultaneous Golden Ages

    blog.cmog.org/2016/08/06/two-simultaneous-golden-ages

    Presented by the Corning Museum of Glass.
    _______

    The Frick and La Serenissima: Arts from the Venetian Republic

    This Tumblr blog by the Frick Art Reference Library explores details in paintings by Veronese and Guardi in The Frick Collection, including connections to the music of the Venetian Republic.

    Presented by The Frick Collection.

    frick-venetianrepublic.tumblr.com
    _______

    From the Met Museum’s Venetian Collection

    The Met showcases a selection of evocative Venetian paintings from its collection, ranging from the 15th through the 18th centuries.

    Presented by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    _______

    Hebrew Books in Venice and Beyond

    Combining beautifully crafted Hebrew manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents from the collections of two venerable libraries, this joint online exhibit showcases Venice’s status as a vital publishing capital and creates a mosaic of meta-narratives among the documents themselves, featuring authors, publishers, editors, illustrators, readers, and—in some cases—censors.

    Presented by the Renato Maestro Library and Archive, and the Library of Congress in collaboration with the Centro Primo Levi; and the Embassy of Italy in Washington, DC.
    _______

    La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic is sponsored by Chubb.

    The Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism has granted La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic its official support (“Patrocinio”) in recognition of Carnegie Hall’s celebration of Italy’s extraordinarily rich and cultural legacy.

    Carnegie Hall gratefully acknowledges the support of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism in Rome; the Italian Embassy in Washington, DC; and the Consulate General of Italy in New York.

    Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
     

    Ticket Information 
    Tickets for events taking place at Carnegie Hall are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, carnegiehall.org.

    For tickets to La Serenissima festival partner events, please contact the specific venue.

    For Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance or until supply lasts. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.

    In addition, for all Carnegie Hall presentations in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage a limited number of partial view (seats with obstructed or limited sight lines or restricted leg room) will be sold for 50% of the full price. For more information on this and other discount ticket programs, including those for students, Notables members, and Bank of America customers, visit carnegiehall.org/discounts.  Artists, programs, and prices are subject to change.
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