• Thursday, Dec 15, 2016

    Music Director and Pianist Daniel Barenboim Leads Staatskapelle Berlin in Unprecedented Complete Cycle of Bruckner Numbered Symphonies, January 19-29

    Bruckner’s Symphonies Are Paired with Mozart’s Piano Concertos Played by Mr. Barenboim Conducting from the Keyboard and Mozart’s Sinfonia concertantes Featuring Members of the Orchestra
    Concerts Mark 60th Anniversary of Mr. Barenboim’s Carnegie Hall Debut

    Image by © Monika Rittershaus

    Program Information
    Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major, K. 595
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 1 in C Minor

    Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
    _____________________________________

    Friday, January 20, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K. 466
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 2 in C Minor
    _____________________________________

    Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 3 in D Minor
    _____________________________________

    Monday, January 23, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 26 in D Major, K. 537, "Coronation"
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major, "Romantic"

    Pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 PM in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with Walter Frisch, Professor of Music, Columbia University.

    This concert is being broadcast live on Classical 105.9 FM WQXR, and streamed on wqxr.org and //carnegiehall.org/wqxr as part of the Carnegie Hall Live series. It will be heard later on radio stations across the country through the WFMT Radio Network.
    _____________________________________

    Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director and Conductor
    Gregor Witt, Oboe
    Matthias Glander, Clarinet
    Ignacio García, Horn
    Mathias Baier, Bassoon

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Sinfonia concertante in E-flat Major for Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, and Orchestra, K. 297b
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major
    _____________________________________

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major, K. 482
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 6 in A Major
    _____________________________________

    Friday, January 27, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director and Conductor
    Wolfram Brandl, Violin
    Yulia Deyneka, Viola

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Sinfonia concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 in E Major

    Pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 PM in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with Paul Hawkshaw, Professor in the Practice of Music History, Yale School of Music.
    _____________________________________

    Saturday, January 28, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director and Conductor

    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 in C Minor
    _____________________________________

    Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN
    Daniel Barenboim, Music Director, Conductor, and Piano

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major, K. 488
    ANTON BRUCKNER Symphony No. 9 in D Minor

    Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
    From January 19–29, for the first time in its history, Carnegie Hall presents a complete cycle of Anton Bruckner’s nine numbered symphonies in a single season, performed in sequence by the Staatskapelle Berlin and Music Director Daniel Barenboim in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage. The cycle is paired with six of Mozart’s most celebrated piano concertos—featuring Mr. Barenboim as soloist conducting from the keyboard.  Also paired with the symphonies are two of the Mozart’s Sinfonia concertantes, featuring members of the Staatskapelle Berlin.

    The January concerts mark the 60th anniversary of Daniel Barenboim’s Carnegie Hall debut on January 20, 1957.  At the age of 14, Mr. Barenboim played Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Symphony of the Air conducted by Leopold Stokowski on a program titled World Peace Through World Music.

    On the eve of the start of the cycle, on Wednesday, January 18 at 7:00 p.m., Daniel Barenboim will be joined by members of the Staatskapelle Berlin for an exclusive evening of conversation and performance, hosted by WQXR’s Nimet Habachy in The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space, 160 Varick Street in Manhattan.

    The January 2017 Bruckner cycle programs at Carnegie Hall include:
    • Thursday, January 19 at 8:00 p.m.—Daniel Barenboim plays Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major, K. 595 with the Staatskapelle Berlin, followed by Bruckner’s Symphony No. 1 in C Minor. 
    • Saturday, January 21­ at 8:00 p.m.—Mr. Barenboim performs Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491 and leads Bruckner’s Symphony No. 3 in D Minor.  Following the concert, the Bruckner Society of America will present Maestro Barenboim with the Julio Kilenyi Medal of Honor in a private post-concert reception in Carnegie Hall’s Shorin Club Room. This honor is bestowed upon individuals and organizations for their exemplary work in furthering the understanding and appreciation of the life and work of Anton Bruckner. 
    • Monday, January 23 at 8:00 p.m.—The program includes Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 26 in D Major, K. 537, “Coronation,” and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major, “Romantic.”  This concert is being broadcast live on Classical 105.9 FM WQXR, and streamed on wqxr.org and carnegiehall.org/wqxr as part of the Carnegie Hall Live series. It will be heard later on radio stations across the country through the WFMT Radio Network.  In addition, a pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 p.m. in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with Walter Frisch, Professor of Music, Columbia University.
    • Tuesday, January 24 at 8:00 p.m.—Theprogram includes Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante in E-flat Major for Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, and Orchestra featuring members of the StaatskapelleBerlin: Gregor Witt (oboe), Matthias Glander (clarinet), Ignacio García (horn), and Mathias Baier (bassoon) as well as Bruckner’s Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major. 
    • Wednesday, January 25 at 8:00 p.m.—Mr. Barenboim leads Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major, K. 482 from the keyboard and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 6 in A Major.
    • Friday, January 27 at 8:00 p.m.—For Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364, featured soloists from the StaatskapelleBerlin include violinist Wolfram Brandl and violist Yulia Deyneka.  Also on the program is Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7 in E Major.  A pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 PM in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with Paul Hawkshaw, Professor in the Practice of Music History, Yale School of Music.
    • Sunday, January 29 at 2:00 p.m.—The cycle concludes with Bruckner’s Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, preceded by Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major, K. 488.
    For an interview with Daniel Barenboim about the upcoming Bruckner cycle and details on the full cycle visit carnegiehall.org/bruckner

    In anticipation of this cycle, Mr. Barenboim offered, “I am delighted to return to Carnegie Hall on this occasion, marking the 60th anniversary of my first concert in January 1957. I am particularly happy to do this with Mozart and Bruckner, two composers who have been very important for me in past programs at the Hall with different orchestras. To now come with the Staatskapelle Berlin, with whom I have done the cycle several times, is a very special joy for me.”

    Mr. Barenboim first discovered an interest in Bruckner’s symphonies at the age of 15.  “I liked the complexity of the slow movement, I liked the ferocious nature of its character—it was like 20th-century music. And I was fascinated by the Bruckner universe, which gave me the feeling that he’d traveled over several centuries. The form is really Baroque, classical Baroque; the musical language is post-Romantic, post-Wagnerian; and there’s something in some of the music, in the Fifth for instance, which sounds almost of the Middle Ages. And so I felt that in the Bruckner symphonies there was a huge journey through the history of mankind.”

    Daniel Barenboim has recorded three complete Bruckner cycles, first with the Chicago Symphony and Berliner Philharmoniker, and most recently with the Staatskapelle Berlin for his own digital record label Peral Music. In January 2017, Deutsche Grammophon releases Staatskapelle Berlin’s recordings of Bruckner’s complete symphonies—currently on Peral—as a box set.


    About the Artists
    Daniel Barenboim made his Carnegie Hall debut at the age of 14 on January 20, 1957.  Since then, he has performed in all three halls at Carnegie Hall, appearing more than 140 times.  Over the last 60 years, he has led some of the world’s greatest orchestras at the Hall, including the London Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and as Music Director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, and Staatskapelle Berlin.  He has also performed as both a solo pianist and in collaboration with some of the world’s finest artists including baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli, violinist Itzhak Perlman, and cellist Yo-Yo Ma, among others.  Additional highlights of his 60 years at Carnegie Hall include a complete cycle of Mozart piano and violin concertos with the English Chamber Orchestra and violinist Isaac Stern in 1976; complete Beethoven symphony cycles with Orchestre de Paris in 1982 and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in 2013; as well as performances of the complete cycle of Beethoven’s piano sonatas in 1986 and 2003.  In addition, with the Staatskapelle Berlin, he led a complete Schumann symphony and concerto cycle in 2004.

    Daniel Barenboim remains the only artist to be invited by Carnegie Hall to curate two Perspectives series, with his Perspectives concerts taking place in the 1999–2000 and 2008–2009 seasons. With the Staatskapelle Berlin, he offered a complete cycle of Beethoven symphonies and piano concertos in 2000 as part of his first Perspectives.  He and the orchestra performed a complete Mahler symphony cycle in 2009, with Mr. Barenboim sharing podium duties with Pierre Boulez, as part of his second series.  As part of his Perspectives in spring 2000, in addition to the Beethoven symphony and piano concertos with the Staatskapelle Berlin, he collaborated with tenor Plácido Domingo, fellow pianist Radu Lupu, and led concerts with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra and Civic Orchestra of Chicago.  In addition, he led a professional training workshop for pianists and conductors and participated in a discussion in Weill Recital Hall with longtime friend and collaborator Edward Said.  For his second Perspectives series during the 2008–2009 season, in addition to the complete Mahler symphony cycle with the Staatskapelle Berlin, Mr. Barenboim performed piano works for four hands with longtime collaborator James Levine.  In addition, he appeared as soloist in the New York premiere of Elliott Carter’s Interventions in honor of the composer’s 100th birthday with Maestro Levine and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

    Since 1992, Daniel Barenboimhas served as the Staatskapelle Berlin’s general music director. In 2000, the orchestra voted him as its conductor for life. Highlights of his past seasons with the orchestra include the performance of all symphonies and piano concertos of Beethoven in Vienna, Paris, London, New York, and Tokyo; Schumann and Brahms symphony cycles; a 10-part cycle of Wagner’s important stage works; a three-part performance of Wagner’s Ring cycle in Japan; and the symphonies and orchestral songs of Mahler conducted by Barenboim and Pierre Boulez at Berlin’s Philharmonie, Vienna’s Musikverein, and Carnegie Hall.

    With a tradition reaching back to 1570, the Staatskapelle Berlin is one of the oldest orchestras in the world. Initially it performed exclusively for the Court. However, when Frederick the Great founded the Royal Court Opera in 1742—today’s State Opera—and merged the Opera and Orchestra, the sphere of activity of the Staatskapelle was broadened and its success story began.

    The exceptional, dark and warm sound of the Staatskapelle, much praised by experts today, has grown out of this long tradition. Over time, famous conductors have contributed to the orchestra’s characteristic sound and musical interpretation. The Staatskapelle Berlin is an essential part of the State Opera, serving as the orchestra for the majority of the company’s opera and ballet performances. In addition, the orchestra performs major symphonic works of the classical, Romantic and contemporary periods, commissioned works, and a broad variety of chamber music as part of its own concert series.
    Ticket Information
    Tickets, priced $44–$137, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, carnegiehall.org.

    For Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance or until supply lasts. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.

    In addition, for all Carnegie Hall presentations in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of partial view (seats with obstructed or limited sight lines or restricted leg room) will be sold for 50% of the full price. For more information on this and other discount ticket programs, including those for students, Notables members, and Bank of America customers, visit carnegiehall.org/discounts. Artists, programs, and prices are subject to change. 
    # # #