Carnegie Hall Presents

Concertos Plus

Dazzling concertos and rousing symphonies are thrilling, but when performed by superstar soloists and stellar orchestras from the US and abroad in historic Carnegie Hall, the experience is unparalleled.
October 30, 2017
China NCPA Orchestra
January 18, 2018
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
February 27, 2018
Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra
April 25, 2018
Daniil Trifonov
Kremerata Baltica

China NCPA Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Monday, October 30, 2017 | 8 PM

Performers

China NCPA Orchestra
Lü Jia, Chief Conductor
Lang Lang, Piano

Program

QIGANG CHEN New Work (US Premiere, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
YIN CHENGZONG / CHU WANGHUA Yellow River Concerto
SIBELIUS Symphony No. 2
One of China’s great orchestras makes its Carnegie Hall debut in a program that features a new work commissioned for the occasion by Qigang Chen (music director of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing) and a classic from its homeland, along with Sibelius’s heroic Symphony No. 2. Lang Lang is the soloist in the legendary Yellow River Concerto, a work beloved for its blend of Chinese themes, colorful Western orchestral writing, and devilishly challenging solo part. While the concerto conjures images of the Chinese river, Sibelius’s symphony is a magnificent paean to Finnish natural beauty and the indomitable spirit of the composer’s countrymen.

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, January 18, 2018 | 8 PM

Performers

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Daniele Gatti, Chief Conductor
Janine Jansen, Violin

Program

BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1
MAHLER Symphony No. 1
“It’s one of astonishing power and beauty,” said The New York Times of violinist Janine Jansen’s “full-bodied, polished-wood sound.” She is the soloist in one of the Romantic era’s great works: Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1. It is certainly a showpiece for the soloist, but the concerto is also a work of tremendous lyricism and emotional weight. The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra is one of the great Mahler orchestras, performing the composer’s Symphony No. 1 at Carnegie Hall—a work that delights with its sounds of nature and lilt of folk song, while uplifting the spirit with its sublime climax.

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 | 8 PM

Performers

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra
Carlos Miguel Prieto, Music Director and Conductor
Jim Atwood, Timpani
Paul Yancich, Timpani

Program

REVUELTAS La noche de los Mayas
PHILIP GLASS Days and Nights in Rocinha
PHILIP GLASS Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra
Music inspired by exotic locations and an unconventional concerto are featured in the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s debut Carnegie Hall concert. Philip Glass’s Days and Nights in Rocinha is an evocative tribute to the largest favela in Brazil, while La noche de los Mayas—a suite drawn from a score Revueltas composed to a film that is now lost—is inspired by Mayan culture, culminating in a blaze of pulsing rhythms and wild percussion. There are more fireworks in Glass’s Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra, a thrilling showcase requiring Olympian virtuosity from the two soloists who play nine timpani between them.

Daniil Trifonov
Kremerata Baltica

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 | 8 PM

Performers

Daniil Trifonov, Piano
Kremerata Baltica


with
Gidon Kremer, Violin
Giedrė Dirvanauskaitė, Cello

Program

ALL-CHOPIN PROGRAM
Variations on "Là ci darem la mano" from Mozart's Don Giovanni (arr. Andrei Pushkarev)
Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 8
Mazurka in A Minor, Op. 17, No.4 (arr. Victor Kissine)
Piano Concerto No. 1 (arr. Yevgeny Sharlat)
The Guardian has cited Daniil Trifonov’s virtuosity, calling it “elegant and purposeful, [with] every trick deployed to summon new colors, rather than as an end itself.” Trifonov and the Kremerata Baltica showcase Chopin’s complete music for piano and orchestra in this concert. From the sheer brio of the Variations on “Là ci darem” from Mozart's Don Giovanni—which inspired Schumann to comment, “Hats off, gentlemen! A genius!”—to the poetry of the Piano Concerto No. 1, Chopin’s mastery has no better advocate than Trifonov.