Carnegie Hall Presents

Orchestra of St Luke's

The polish and virtuosity of the Orchestra of St. Luke’s make it one of New York’s finest ensembles. Hear why when the orchestra performs favorites by Mozart and Beethoven.
October 12, 2017
Orchestra of St. Luke's
December 7, 2017
Orchestra of St. Luke's
February 15, 2018
Orchestra of St. Luke's

Orchestra of St. Luke's

Mozart's "Great" Mass with Heras-Casado

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, October 12, 2017 | 8 PM

Performers

Orchestra of St. Luke's
Pablo Heras-Casado, Conductor Laureate
Camilla Tilling, Soprano
Kate Lindsey, Mezzo-Soprano
Thomas Cooley, Tenor
Michael Sumuel, Bass-Baritone
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller, Conductor

Program

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1
MOZART Mass in C Minor, K. 427, "Great"
The spirit of Bach—particularly his Mass in B Minor—informs the grand choral writing of Mozart’s Mass in C Minor. The influence of the florid Italian operatic style is also evident in solo passages, gloriously so in the “Laudamus te,” a coloratura mezzo-soprano showpiece, and in the tender soprano aria “Et incarnatus est.” Beethoven took his own path, but his Symphony No. 1 honors Haydn’s symphonic model with more adventurous harmonies—especially in its opening—and a more robust role for winds and brass.

Orchestra of St. Luke's

Labadie Conducts Mozart's "Jupiter"

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, December 7, 2017 | 8 PM

Performers

Orchestra of St. Luke's
Bernard Labadie, Principal Conductor Designate
Augustin Hadelich, Violin

Program

KRAUS Olympie Overture
MOZART Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter"
BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto
Mozart brings the Classical symphony to a glorious apotheosis, while Beethoven heralds a new age of violin concertos. The “Jupiter”—Mozart’s final symphony—has grandeur in its opening movement, tenderness in its Andante, grace and wit in the Menuetto, and propulsive joy in its finale. The antecedents of the large scale, athletic violin concertos of the Romantic era are found in Beethoven’s masterpiece. His Violin Concerto is broader in scope, more opulently orchestrated, and features a solo part unlike anything that came before it. There is also a rarely performed work by Mozart’s Swedish contemporary, Joseph Martin Kraus.

Orchestra of St. Luke's

Beethoven's "Emperor" with Denk

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thursday, February 15, 2018 | 8 PM

Performers

Orchestra of St. Luke's
Robert Spano, Conductor
Kelley O'Connor, Mezzo-Soprano
Jeremy Denk, Piano

Program

MOZART Symphony No. 40
BRYCE DESSNER New Work for Mezzo-Soprano and Orchestra (World Premiere, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 5, "Emperor"
Mozart’s final symphonies are pinnacles of Classicism that boldly point to the Romantics. His Symphony No. 40 opens in a state of nervous agitation and culminates in an edge-of-your-seat finale that Wagner called “exuberant with rapture and audacity.” The “Emperor” Piano Concerto is grandly virtuosic and heroic in spirit—a towering landmark where Beethoven the master pianist and symphonist are brilliantly fused.