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  • Carnegie Hall Presents
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CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Maxim Vengerov, Violin
Roustem Saïtkoulov, Piano

Tuesday, October 30, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
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Maxim Vengerov by Benjamin Ealovega and Roustem Saïtkoulov by Eric Legouhy
Maxim Vengerov, “one of the most brilliant violinists you’ll ever hear” (The Washington Post), returns to Carnegie Hall with a program that showcases his tremendous virtuosity and versatility. He performs three magnificent sonatas: Brahms’s powerful Third, Enescu's passionately expressive Second, and Ravel’s lyrical final chamber work with its famous central movement. Vengerov also displays his dazzling technical prowess in showpieces by Paganini and Ernst.

Performers

Maxim Vengerov, Violin
Roustem Saïtkoulov, Piano

Program

BRAHMS Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor
ENESCU Violin Sonata No. 2 in F Minor
RAVEL Violin Sonata
ERNST The Last Rose of Summer
PAGANINI I palpiti (after Rossini's "Di tanti palpiti" from Tancredi; arr. Fritz Kreisler)

Encores:
KREISLER Caprice Viennois, Op. 2
RACHMANINOFF Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 (arr. Jascha Heifetz)
BRAHMS Hungarian Dance No. 2 in D Minor (arr. Joseph Joachim)

Event Duration

The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.
Recital: Maxim Vengerov, violon & Roustem Saïtkoulov, piano
Breguet | Exclusive Timepiece

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At a Glance

BRAHMS  Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108

Composed between 1878 and 1888, Brahms’s three sonatas for violin and piano are works of mature and unostentatious mastery. In contrast to the Violin Concerto of 1878, the three sonatas are predominantly intimate and conversational in tone. Dark and impassioned, the D-Minor Sonata may reflect the platonic love affair that Brahms had long carried on with pianist Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann’s widow.

 

ENESCU  Violin Sonata No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 6

Enescu met Brahms when he was a student in Vienna in the early 1890s, and later became a noted interpreter of Brahms’s Violin Concerto. Enescu had outgrown Brahms’s influence and fallen under the sway of César Franck and Gabriel Fauré by the time he wrote his F-Minor Violin Sonata at the end of the decade. The great violin teacher Carl Flesch called it “one of the most important works in the whole literature of the sonata.”

 

RAVEL  Violin Sonata

Hints of W. C. Handy and George Gershwin spice Ravel’s spare-textured, jazz-influenced Violin Sonata, written in the mid-1920s. Yehudi Menuhin recalled that Ravel burst into the studio of his teacher, Enescu, excitedly brandishing the manuscript score. After the two men read through the sonata, Enescu amazed the young Menuhin by playing it a second time entirely from memory.

 

ERNST  The Last Rose of Summer

Following in Nicolò Paganini’s footsteps, Ernst had a stellar career as an itinerant violin virtuoso, teacher, and composer. According to his pupil Joseph Joachim, “Paganini may have been a greater virtuoso, but he could not have played with more warmth, poetry, and esprit than Ernst.” This set of bravura variations on a popular Irish song—comprising the final movement of Ernst’s Six Polyphonic Studies—attests to Ernst’s technical wizardry.

 

PAGANINI  I palpiti

Both Paganini and Gioachino Rossini were at the peak of their fame in 1819, when the violinist saluted his younger composer friend in this scintillating paraphrase of the hit aria “Di tanti palpiti” from Rossini’s opera Tancredi. Originally scored for violin and orchestra, Paganini tuned his fiddle up a half-step to make it stand out more brilliantly.

Bios

Maxim Vengerov

Universally hailed as one of the world’s finest musicians, Grammy Award winner Maxim Vengerov also enjoys international acclaim as a conductor. Born in 1974, he began his career as a ...

Universally hailed as one of the world’s finest musicians, Grammy Award winner Maxim Vengerov also enjoys international acclaim as a conductor. Born in 1974, he began his career as a solo violinist at the age of five, won the International Henryk Wieniawski Violin Competition and Carl Flesch International Violin Competition at ages 10 and 15, respectively, and has gone on to record extensively for high-profile labels that include Teldec and EMI.

Mr. Vengerov turned his attention to conducting in 2007, following in the footsteps of his mentor, Mstislav Rostropovich. Mr. Vengerov graduated in 2014 with a diploma of excellence from Moscow’s Ippolitov-Ivanov Institute, where he studied with Yuri Simonov, and has since completed a two-year program in opera conducting. He made his conducting debut in Moscow with Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin.

Highlights of Mr. Vengerov’s 2018–2019 season include opening the Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala’s season with Riccardo Chailly, as well as residencies with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo and Paris’s Philharmonie. During the 2017–2018 season, Mr. Vengerov premiered a new concerto by renowned composer Qigang Chen at the Beijing International Music Festival, conducted the Orchestre National de France in Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10, and toured Europe, China, and the US in recital.

Encouraging young talent is one of Mr. Vengerov’s greatest passions, and he has held various teaching positions around the world. He is currently a professor at the International Menuhin Music Academy in Switzerland, recently accompanying and conducting a concert that featured his students and Cecilia Bartoli at Rosey Concert Hall. Since September 2016, Mr. Vengerov has been the Polonsky Visiting Professor of Violin at London’s Royal College of Music. In 1997, he became the first classical musician to be appointed an International Goodwill Ambassador of UNICEF. Mr. Vengerov plays the ex-Kreutzer Stradivari violin from 1727.

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Roustem Saïtkoulov

Born in Kazan, Russia, Roustem Saïtkoulov entered the Kazan Conservatory at the age of six. He went on to attend the Moscow Conservatory, where he studied with Eliso Virsaladze and ...

Born in Kazan, Russia, Roustem Saïtkoulov entered the Kazan Conservatory at the age of six. He went on to attend the Moscow Conservatory, where he studied with Eliso Virsaladze and received his soloist’s diploma, as well as the Munich Music High School. Mr. Saïtkoulov has won prizes at numerous international competitions, including the Ferruccio Busoni International Piano Competition, Unisa International Piano Competition, Long-Thibaud-Crespin Competition, and Concours Géza Anda. He also received first prize in the “Roma” International Piano Competition and grand prize in the Monte-Carlo Music Masters.

Mr. Saïtkoulov performs frequently with the world’s most renowned orchestras, including the Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo, Prague Symphony Orchestra, Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Tokyo New City Orchestra, Beijing Symphony Orchestra, and Sinfonia Varsovia, as well as London’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Turin’s RAI National Symphony Orchestra.

He has performed concerts and recitals all over the world in Russia (Moscow’s International House of Music and St. Petersburg’s Philharmonia), China (Beijing’s National Centre for the Performing Arts and Guangzhou’s Opera House), Japan (Tokyo’s Metropolitan Art Space and Osaka’s Symphony Hall), Argentina (Buenos Aires’s Teatro Colón), Mexico (Mexico City’s Palacio de Bellas Artes), and Australia (Sydney Opera House), as well as in the US, Canada, South Africa, Chile, and in many of the most important European venues.

Mr. Saïtkoulov has been invited to perform in leading festivals that include the Montreux Jazz Festival, Festival International de Piano de la Roque d’Anthéron, Festival Pianistico Internazionale di Brescia e Bergamo, Piano aux Jacobins, Festival Radio France Occitanie Montpellier, and Festival Printemps des Arts de Monte-Carlo, as well as festivals in Yokohama, Bologna, Merano, Edinburgh, and Menton. He has recorded several solo piano albums for EMI Classics and Dinemec Classics, and released an album with Master Chord Records in 2012 that featured Chopin’s piano concertos with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Grzegorz Nowak. Mr. Saïtkoulov also performs in a critically acclaimed duo with Maxim Vengerov.

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