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CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS

Emanuel Ax, Piano
Leonidas Kavakos, Violin
Yo-Yo Ma, Cello

Friday, March 6, 2020 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
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Yo-Yo Ma, Leonidas Kavakos, and Emanuel Ax by Shane McCauley
Please be advised that due to a mechanical issue, the west elevator inside Carnegie Hall’s main lobby is temporarily out of order. As a result, there is no elevator service with direct access to the west side of the Second Tier. The auditorium will open 45 minutes before the concert to allow ticket holders additional time to reach their seats. For additional accessibility questions, please call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800.

Emanuel Ax
, Leonidas Kavakos, and Yo-Yo Ma recall the great chamber music ensembles anchored by violinist Isaac Stern. Stern’s collaborations with pianist Eugene Istomin and cellist Leonard Rose were legendary, and this program echoes their history of celebrated performances of Beethoven works. Hear a dramatic cello sonata, a violin sonata whose genial tone belies the difficult circumstances in which it was written, and a soulful and inventive trio.

Part of: Great Artists II and Beethoven Celebration

Please note that if you purchase stage seating, please arrive one hour before concert time.

There is a limit of 8 tickets per household. Additional orders exceeding the ticket limit may be cancelled without notice. This includes orders associated with the same name, email address, billing address, credit card number and/or other information.

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Emanuel Ax is also performing October 15, March 4, March 8, and May 14.

Leonidas Kavakos is also performing October 26, March 4, and March 8.

Yo-Yo Ma is also performing March 4 and March 8.

Performers

Emanuel Ax, Piano
Leonidas Kavakos, Violin
Yo-Yo Ma, Cello

Program

BEETHOVEN Cello Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 5, No. 2

BEETHOVEN Violin Sonata No. 6 in A Major, Op. 30, No. 1

BEETHOVEN Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70, No. 2


Encore:

BRAHMS Andante con moto from Piano Trio No. 2 in C Major, Op. 87

Event Duration

The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.
Ernst & Young Logo

Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP

The Trustees of Carnegie Hall gratefully acknowledge the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Debs in support of the 2019-2020 season.

Lead support for the Beethoven Celebration is provided by The Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund.

National Endowment for the Arts: arts.gov

Public support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

In honor of the centenary of his birth, Carnegie Hall’s 2019–2020 season is dedicated to the memory of Isaac Stern in recognition of his extraordinary contributions to Carnegie Hall, arts advocacy, and the field of music.

At a Glance

BEETHOVEN  Cello Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 5, No. 2

A 26-year-old Beethoven presented the two Op. 5 sonatas as a calling card to the cello-playing Prussian monarch, King Friedrich Wilhelm II, in Berlin in 1796. The works’ understated exuberance played to Beethoven’s strengths as a pianist and to the virtuosity of the exiled French cellist Jean-Louis Duport.

 

BEETHOVEN  Violin Sonata No. 6 in A Major, Op. 30, No. 1

Although the title page of the first edition specified that the Op. 30 sonatas were written for piano “with the accompaniment of a violin,” Beethoven clearly had a more egalitarian partnership in mind. In fact, the brilliant finale of the “Kreutzer” was originally intended for the A-Major Sonata, which blends lyricism and drama in ways that must have seemed novel and perplexing to many of Beethoven’s listeners.

 

BEETHOVEN  Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70, No. 2

Composed in the summer of 1808, Beethoven’s two Op. 70 piano trios followed close on the heels of such exuberantly expansive works as the Fifth and Sixth symphonies and the Cello Sonata in A Major. E. T. A. Hoffmann likened their innovative sound world to a “spirit kingdom” in which “the enraptured soul listens to the unknown language and understands all the most secret allusions by which it has been aroused.”

Bios

Emanuel Ax

Born in Lvov, Poland, Emanuel Ax moved to Winnipeg, Canada, with his family when he was a young boy. He made his New York debut in the Young Concert Artists Series and in 1974 won the first  ...

Born in Lvov, Poland, Emanuel Ax moved to Winnipeg, Canada, with his family when he was a young boy. He made his New York debut in the Young Concert Artists Series and in 1974 won the first Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition in Tel Aviv. Mr. Ax won the Michaels Award of the Young Concert Artists in 1975, followed four years later by the Avery Fisher Prize.

Highlights of the 2019–2020 season include a tour of European summer festivals with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and longtime collaborative partner Bernard Haitink, a tour of Asia with the London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Simon Rattle, US concerts with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and Lahav Shani, and three concerts with Leonidas Kavakos and Yo-Yo Ma. Further participation in Carnegie Hall’s Beethoven Celebration will culminate in a solo recital in May, which is preceded by recitals in Madison, Santa Barbara, Orange County, Washington, Las Vegas, and Colorado Springs. Mr. Ax performs with orchestras in Houston, Baltimore, Atlanta, San Diego, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Montreal, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis. In Europe and abroad, he can be heard with orchestras in London, Frankfurt, Berlin, Rome, Zurich, Rotterdam, and Tel Aviv.

Mr. Ax has been an exclusive Sony Classical recording artist since 1987. One of his most recent recording features Brahms’s piano trios with Mr. Kavakos and Mr. Ma. He has received Grammy Awards for the second and third volumes of his cycle of Haydn’s piano sonatas, and made a series of Grammy-winning recordings of the Beethoven and Brahms sonatas for cello and piano with Mr. Ma. In the 2004–2005 season, Mr. Ax contributed to an International Emmy Award–winning BBC documentary commemorating the Holocaust, which aired on the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. His recording Variations received the ECHO Klassik award for Solo Recording of the Year in 2013.

Mr. Ax is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and holds honorary doctorate degrees in music from Skidmore College, Yale University, and Columbia University. For more information, visit emanuelax.com.

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Leonidas Kavakos

Leonidas Kavakos is recognized as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known for his virtuosity, musicianship, and integrity of his playing. By age 21, he had won three major ...

Leonidas Kavakos is recognized as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known for his virtuosity, musicianship, and integrity of his playing. By age 21, he had won three major competitions: the International Jean Sibelius Violin Competition (1985), Paganini Competition (1988), and Naumburg International Violin Competition (1988). This success led to his recording Sibelius’s Violin Concerto—the first recording of this work in history—which won the Gramophone Concerto of the Year Award in 1991. Mr. Kavakos was awarded the Gramophone Artist of the Year Award in 2014, and was the 2017 winner of Denmark’s Léonie Sonning Music Prize.

Highlights of Mr. Kavakos’s 2019–2020 season include a tour with Emanuel Ax and Yo-Yo Ma performing Beethoven trios; solo performances with the symphony orchestras of Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and Montreal; and appearances with the Munich Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in Boston. In Europe, he performs with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Mariinsky Orchestra, and Orchestre de Paris, among others. He performs in Asia with the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, Singapore Symphony Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, and National Symphony Orchestra of Taiwan.

Mr. Kavakos has developed close relationships with many of the world’s leading orchestras; more recently, he has also built a strong profile as a conductor. This season, he conducts the Orchestre philharmonique de Radio France, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Czech Philharmonic, and RAI National Symphony Orchestra.

Mr. Kavakos has an exclusive contract with Sony Classical, for whom he has recorded Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, Mozart’s violin concertos (play-conducting with Camerata Salzburg), and Brahms’s trios with Mr. Ma and Mr. Ax. In October 2019, he released a recording of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, play-conducting with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. Upcoming recording projects include J. S. Bach’s complete solo sonatas and partitas.

Mr. Kavakos plays the “Willemotte” Stradivarius violin of 1734.

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Yo-Yo Ma

Yo-Yo Ma’s multifaceted career is a testament to his enduring belief in culture’s power to generate trust and understanding. Whether performing new or familiar works from the ...

Yo-Yo Ma’s multifaceted career is a testament to his enduring belief in culture’s power to generate trust and understanding. Whether performing new or familiar works from the cello repertoire, collaborating with communities and institutions to explore culture’s social impact, or delving into unexpected musical forms, Mr. Ma strives to foster connections that stimulate our imagination and reinforce our humanity.

With partners from around the world and across disciplines, he creates programs that stretch the boundaries of genre and tradition to explore music-making not only as a means to share and express meaning, but also as a model for the cultural collaboration he considers essential to a strong society. It was this belief that inspired Mr. Ma to establish Silkroad, a collective of artists from around the world who create music that engages their many traditions.

In August 2018, Mr. Ma began a new journey, setting out to perform J. S. Bach’s six suites for solo cello in one sitting in 36 locations around the world: iconic venues that encompass our cultural heritage, creativity, and the challenges of peace and understanding that will shape our future. Each concert is an example of culture’s power to create moments of shared recognition, as well as an invitation to a larger conversation about culture, society, and the themes that connect us all.

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