• Festival Partners

  • Performances   |   Talks   |   Exhibits
  • Performances

    St. Thomas Church Fifth Ave Saturday, February 4 at 2 PM

    Daniel Hyde, Organ


    Daniel Hyde—Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue’s new organist and director of music—explores the hugely influential Venetian style, with works ranging from luminaries such as Giovanni Gabrieli—the organist of Venice’s venerable St. Mark’s Basilica for nearly three decades—Merula, and Vivaldi (as arranged by Bach and Walther), to 20th-century homages by Ligeti and Tippett.

    Presented by Concerts at Saint Thomas.

    Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue
    1 West 53rd Street | Manhattan
    saintthomaschurch.org/music | 212-757-7013

    Free
     

    The Juilliard School Wednesday, February 8 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 11 at 8 PM
    Sunday, February 12 at 2 PM
    Thursday, February 16 at 7:30 PM
    Sunday, February 19 at 8 PM

    The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice

    Written by William Shakespeare
    Directed by Jonathan Rosenberg


    Originally set in late 16th-century Venice and Cyprus, Shakespeare’s epic tragedy of prejudice, mistrust, and betrayal still resonates strongly today. With a scaled-down cast of seven actors, Jonathan Rosenberg examines the corrosive effect of social forces on the most intimate of human and family relationships.

    Presented by Juilliard Drama.

    The Juilliard School | McClelland Drama Theater
    155 West 65th Street, Fourth Floor | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu | 212-769-7406

    Tickets: $20, $10 for non-Juilliard students
     

    Casa Italiana Thursday, February 9 at 6:30 PM

    Memoirs

    Written by Carlo Goldoni
    Directed by Jason O’Connell
    Kairos Italy Theater

    Pioneering 18th-century Venetian playwright and librettist Carlo Goldoni reinvigorated the commedia dell’arte tradition, injecting his comedies with realism, tighter plots, a new spontaneity, and middle-class characters. Kairos Italy Theater gives the US premiere of a staged version of his Memorie (Memoirs)—performed only once before under the direction of the legendary Giorgio Strehler.

    Presented by Kairos Italy Theater in collaboration with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.

    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street | Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org | 212-998-8739

    Free
     

    The Juilliard School Friday, February 10 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 11 at 2 PM
    Wednesday, February 15 at 7:30 PM
    Saturday, February 18 at 8 PM
    Sunday, February 19 at 2 PM

    The Serpent Woman

    Written by Carlo Gozzi
    Directed by Orlando Pabotoy

    Venetian writer and satirist Carlo Gozzi—a proponent of commedia dell’arte when the form was in decline—wrote this tragicomic fairy tale in 1762. Ribald, fanciful, funny, dark, and picaresque, this play recounts the tribulations of a mortal king in love with a fairy, set in a phantasmagoric world of demons and mythic beasts.

    Presented by Juilliard Drama.

    The Juilliard School | McClelland Drama Theater
    155 West 65th Street, Fourth Floor | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu | 212-769-7406

    Tickets: $20, $10 for non-Juilliard students
     

    Casa Italiana Saturday, February 11 at 3 PM

    The Worth of Women: Wherein is Clearly Revealed Their Nobility and Superiority to Men

    Written by Moderata Fonte
    Translated by Virginia Cox
    Directed by Stephan Wolfert
    Kairos Italy Theater

    Kairos Italy Theater gives the US premiere of The Worth of Women by Venetian writer and poet Moderata Fonte, a 16th-century advocate of gender equality. Radical and witty, this work depicts conversations among seven diverse Venetian noblewomen, exploring women’s roles in public and private, femininity and ambition, men’s hostility, and possible remedies.

    Presented by Kairos Italy Theater in collaboration with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.

    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street | Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org | 212-998-8739

    Free
     

    The Juilliard School February 11–22

    Handel’s Agrippina

    Juilliard Opera
    Juilliard415

    Composed for Carnival in 1709, Handel’s path-breaking opera Agrippina marked the 24-year-old composer’s first operatic masterpiece, establishing his international reputation and setting the course for future triumphs. Juilliard Opera offers one concert performance at Alice Tully Hall and three staged performances in the black-box setting of the Willson Theater.

    Presented by The Juilliard School.

    Saturday, February 11 at 7:30 PM
    Conducted by Laurence Cummings

    Alice Tully Hall
    1941 Broadway | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu | 212-721-6500

    Tickets: $20 (available starting January 11); $10 for non-Juilliard students (Alice Tully Box Office only)



    Saturday, February 18 at 2 PM
    Monday, February 20 at 7:30 PM
    Wednesday, February 22 at 7:30 PM

    Conducted by Jeffrey Grossman
    Directed by Louisa Proske

    Willson Theater
    155 West 65th Street | Manhattan
    events.juilliard.edu | 212-721-6500

    Tickets: $30 (available starting January 11)
     

    Salon Sanctuary Thursday, February 16 at 8 PM

    From Ghetto to Cappella: Interfaith Exchanges in the Music of Baroque Italy

    Jessica Gould, Soprano
    Noa Frenkel, Contralto
    Diego Cantalupi, Lute
    Members of L’Aura Soave Cremona

    The early-music series Salon/Sanctuary Concerts offers a program of unaccompanied Hebrew chants and music of Strozzi, S. Rossi, and B. Marcello, among others, illustrating a vibrant dialogue during a time of great oppression—a cross-fertilization of musical ideas and cultures between Venice’s Jews and Catholics that traversed the forbidding walls of the city’s Jewish ghetto.

    Presented by Kairos Italy Theater in collaboration with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.

    The Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center
    1 East 65th Street | Manhattan
    salonsanctuary.org | 888-718-4253

    Tickets start at $25.
     

  • Talks

    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University

    Italian Academy Columbia U Thursday, February 2 at 5:30 PM

    The Millenarian Venice

    Jordi Savall | Magdalena Baczewska, Moderator

    On the eve of the opening concert of La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic, early-music legend and forensic musicologist Jordi Savall discusses the myriad musical styles and influences at play throughout the 1,000-year span life of the Venetian Republic.

    Presented by The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University.

    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
    1161 Amsterdam Avenue | Manhattan
    italianacademy.columbia.edu/events | 212-854-2306

    Free



    Monday, February 13 at 5:30 PM

    EAST OF VENICE: La Serenissima as Seen from its Eastern Frontiers

    Konstantina Zanou, Moderator
    Panelists
    Larry Wolff | Molly Greene | Natalie Rothman | Patricia Fortini Brown | Daphne Lappa

    Viewing the history of the Venetian Republic through the lens of its neighbors in the Balkans and its Mediterranean frontiers, this international panel of specialists examines the various exchanges—cultural, linguistic, religious, among others—between the Ottoman and the Venetian worlds, East and West.

    Co-presented by Columbia University’s Department of Italian and The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America.

    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
    1161 Amsterdam Avenue | Manhattan
    italianacademy.columbia.edu/events | 212-854-2306

    Free
     

    The Morgan Library & Museum

    Morgan Library Monday, February 6 at 6:30 PM

    Music in Situ: Venetian Music in its Artistic Context

    Participants
    Ellen Rosand | Mary E. Frank | Ex Umbris and Grant Herreid


    Featuring commentary, slides, and live musical selections, this multimedia experience highlights the architectural monuments in which musical works of the late-Renaissance and early modern periods were performed, the paintings and frescoes also housed therein, and a sampling of the music that marked the last centuries of the Venetian Republic.

    Co-presented by The Morgan Library & Museum and Save Venice Inc.

    The Morgan Library & Museum
    225 Madison Avenue | Manhattan
    themorgan.org/programs | 212-685-0008, ext. 560

    Tickets: $20; $15 for members of The Morgan Library & Museum or Save Venice Inc. Doors open at 5:30 PM.
     

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    MET Museum February 9 and 16

    Celebrating Serenissma


    Thursday, February 9 at 11 AM
    “The Brothel House of Europe”: Venice on the Grand Tour

    with Kevin Salatino

    Thursday, February 16 at 11 AM
    Venice in the Age of Jacopo Tintoretto

    with Andrea Bayer

     
    Taking a critical look at the culture and society of the Venetian Republic, the first talk offers a window onto the city’s fabled association with eroticism and sexual license that shaped the experiences of 18th-century Grand Tourists in Venice. The second focuses on the Renaissance master’s bold and dramatic paintings, and the extraordinary characters who peopled his world.

    Presented by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    1000 Fifth Avenue | Manhattan
    metmuseum.org/events/programs | 212-570-3949

    Tickets: $30 for each talk; $50 for the series
    (Ticket price includes admission to the museum.)
     

    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò

    Casa Italiana Friday, February 10 at 6:30 PM

    Sirens of La Serenissima: Creative Women and Feminist Forerunners in Early Modern Venice
    Meredith Ray | Lynn Westwater | Ann Rosalind Jones
    Virginia Cox, Moderator


    This roundtable discussion on the extraordinary tradition of early modern Venetian women’s writing features readings from works penned by courtesan Veronica Franco; dissident Baroque nun Arcangela Tarabotti; outspoken Jewish author, poet, and intellectual Sara Copia Sullam; and proto-feminist theorist Moderata Fonte.

    Presented by New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò.

    New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò
    24 West 12th Street | Manhattan
    casaitaliananyu.org | 212-998-8739

    Free
     

    The Frick Collection

    The Frick Collection Wednesday, February 15 at 6 PM

    The Painter and the Libertine: Titian and Pietro Aretino

    Led by Xavier F. Salomon

    Xavier Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator of The Frick Collection, discusses one of the museum’s most important Venetian paintings: Titian’s portrait of his friend Pietro Aretino—a well-connected author, playwright, satirist, blackmailer, and libertine.

    Presented by The Frick Collection.

    The Frick Collection
    1 East 70th Street | Manhattan
    frick.org | 212-288-0700

    Free; first come, first served (Children under 10 not admitted.)



    Thursday, February 16 at 6 PM

    Venetian Paintings in The Frick Collection

    Led by Xavier F. Salomon

    Between 1905 and 1918, Henry Clay Frick acquired a small but superb collection of paintings by Bellini, Titian, Veronese, and Tiepolo. In this seminar, these exceptional works are given a closer look, with a focus on the artists who created them and their influence on one another.

    Presented by The Frick Collection.

    The Frick Collection
    1 East 70th Street | Manhattan
    frick.org | 212-288-0700

    $100; $90 for members of The Frick Collection
     

    Italian Cultural Institute

    Italian Cultural Institute Thursday, February 16 at 6 PM

    The Golden Age of the Venetian Republic


    “Venice and the Ottoman Empire”
    with Alessandro Barbero

    “Freedom of Thought in Renaissance Venice”
    with Edward Muir Jr.

    In talks that explore La Serenissima’s social, cultural, and political history, bestselling Italian historian and novelist Alessandro Barbero views Venice’s relationship with the Ottoman Empire through the lens of the epic Battle of Lepanto in 1571, while Edward Muir Jr. examines the remarkably free exchange of ideas that flourished in Venice—some of them incendiary.

    Presented by the Italian Cultural Institute.

    Italian Cultural Institute
    686 Park Avenue | Manhattan
    www.iicnewyork.esteri.it | 212-879-4242

    Free; online reservations recommended
     

    The Jewish Museum

    Jewish Musem Sunday, February 19 at 2 PM

    The Ghetto, Venice, and the Jews: A Historical Journey
    Cristiana Facchini | Donatella Calabi | Giuseppe Veltri
    Evelyn Chayes | Piergabriele Mancuso
    Alessandro Guetta, Moderator

    Founded in 1516, Venice’s Jewish ghetto marked the first instance of minority segregation in Western history—a new socio-political model that has since emerged as a universal metaphor of oppression and resilience, and as a prototype for understanding ghettos generally. The panel scrutinizes this notion—and the implications of—retroactively applying modern concepts such as nation-state, citizenship, rights, identity, and assimilation to the Venetian Republic, when they weren’t yet part of the cultural and social mindset.

    Presented by the Centro Primo Levi in partnership with New York University / Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò and The Jewish Museum.

    The Jewish Museum
    1109 Fifth Avenue | Manhattan
    thejewishmuseum.org/programs | 212-423-3337

    Free
     

  • Exhibits

    Italian Cultural Institute

    Italian Cultural Institute February 2–March 2

    Memories of La Serenissima: Nineteenth-Century Artists in Venice


    This exhibit, curated by Marco Bertoli, presents a selection of paintings by artists born not long after the fall of the Venetian Republic who paid it vivid tribute, revealing how the memory of La Serenissima and the ties to its wondrous artistic canon endured throughout the century that followed its demise.

    Presented by the Italian Cultural Institute.

    Italian Cultural Institute
    686 Park Avenue | Manhattan
    www.iicnewyork.esteri.it | 212-879-4242

    Free
     

    New York Public Library

    New York Public Library February 10–August 31

    Love in Venice


    This exhibition examines the literary, artistic, musical, and cultural aspects of Venice’s seductiveness, including its beautiful courtesans, lavish festivals, lively carnivals, and libertine counterculture through diverse works that range from etchings by Tiepolo and a letter from Lord Byron recounting his amorous conquests, to wedding poetry and pop-up books that reveal the undergarments of Venetian prostitutes.

    Presented by the New York Public Library.

    New York Public Library
    476 Fifth Avenue | Manhattan
    nypl.org | 917-275-6975

    Free